The Literary panorama, Volume 7

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

p. 204 history of engraving (1818 article)

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 733 - Himself best knows : but strangely-visited people, All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye, The mere despair of surgery, he cures ; Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on with holy prayers : and, 'tis spoken, To the succeeding royalty he leaves The healing benediction.
Page 593 - I laughed, and danced, and talked, and sung : And, proud of health, of freedom vain, Dreamed not of sorrow, care, or pain ; Concluding, in those hours of glee, That all the world was made for me. But when the hour of trial came, When sickness shook this trembling frame, When folly's gay pursuits were o'er, And I could sing and dance no more, It then occurred, how sad 'twould be Were this world only made for me.
Page 51 - It is not, however, the grandeur of military success which has alone fixed our admiration, or commanded our applause. It has been that generous and lofty spirit which inspired your troops with unbounded confidence, and taught them to know that the day of battle was always a day of victory ; that moral courage and enduring fortitude which in perilous times, when gloom and doubt had beset ordinary minds, stood nevertheless unshaken, and that ascendancy of character, which, uniting the energies of jealous...
Page 627 - If her temper be bad, want of breeding makes her worse, and she grows haughty, insolent, and loud. If she be passionate, want of manners makes her termagant and a scold, which is much at one with lunatic. If she be proud, want of discretion (which still is breeding) makes her conceited, fantastic, and ridiculous. And from these she degenerates to be turbulent, clamorous, noisy, nasty, and the devil.
Page 545 - ... for setting to work the children of all such whose parents shall not by the said churchwardens and overseers, or the greater part of them, be thought able to keep and maintain their children ; and also for setting to work all such persons, married or unmarried, having no means to maintain them, and use no ordinary and daily trade of life to get their living by...
Page 731 - The hen is hung at a fellow's back, who has also some horse-bells about him ; the rest of the fellows are blinded, and have boughs in their hands, with which they chase this fellow and his hen about some large court or small enclosure. The fellow with his hen and bells shifting as well as he can, they follow the sound, and sometimes hit him and his hen, other times, if he can get behind one of them, they thresh one another well...
Page 809 - Flowers of rhetoric in sermons and serious discourses are like the blue and red flowers in corn, pleasing to those who come only for amusement, but prejudicial to him who would reap the profit from it.
Page 75 - THE BORDER ANTIQUITIES OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND; COMPRISING SPECIMENS OF ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, AND OTHER VESTIGES OF FORMER AGES, '^ . " ACCOMPANIED BY DESCRIPTIONS. TOGETHER WITH . ,. \^-' ILLUSTRATIONS OF REMARKABLE INCIDENTS IN BORDER HISTORY AND TRADITION, AND ORIGINAL POETRY.
Page 631 - ... was encircled in an instant in his horrid folds. So quick, indeed, and so instantaneous was the act, that it was impossible for the eye to follow the rapid convolution of his elongated body. It was not a regular screw-like turn that was formed, but resembling rather a knot, one part of the body overlaying the other, as if to add weight to the muscular pressure, the more effectually to crush his object.
Page 625 - ... sooner. His religion is a part of his copyhold, which he takes from his landlord, and refers it wholly to his discretion : yet if he give him leave he is a good Christian, to his power (that is), comes to church in his best clothes, and sits there with his neighbours, where he is capable only of two prayers, for rain and fair weather.

Bibliographic information