The Life of George Washington

Front Cover
F. Andrews, 1839 - Presidents - 562 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Approved by Washington 433
42
Power of forming Treaties
46
Message from the Indians
48
Army retires to Wills Creek
59
His Conduct in the Battle
64
Effects of the Battle on the Character of Washington
65
His Journey to Mount Vernon
68
Difficulties respecting the Command at Fort Cumberland
71
The Plot unravelled
77
Retires to Mount Vernon ill of a Fever
84
His Fears for the Fate of the Expedition
91
Washington furnishes to General Forbes a Line of March
93
Elected a Member of the House of Burgesses
99
Anecdote
105
Tour to the Ohio
111
Attends the Convention at Williamsburg
119
Washingtons Sentiments on the State of Affairs
127
Ascertains the State of the Army
133
Corresponds with numerous Public Bodies
139
Deficiency of Powder in Camp
145
Slow Progress of Enlistments
151
Washington proposes an Attack on Boston
157
Congress award a Vote of Thanks and a Medal to Washington
163
Military Works inspected
165
Washington visits Congress at Philadelphia
166
Strength of the American Army
175
Effects of the recent Defeat
181
Skirmish near Haerlem and Death of Colonel Knowlton
187
Engaged in the Affairs of the Army
188
Injurious Effects of an irregular System of Bounties
193
Capture of Fort Washington
199
Proceedings of Congress on that Occasion
203
Washingtons Firmness and Spirit under Reverses
205
Battle of Trenton
211
Retires to Winter Quarters at Morristown
217
Washingtons Counter Proclamation
220
Exchange of Prisoners
222
Movements of the American Army
229
Motives for fighting the Battle
235
Operations on the Delaware
241

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 341 - With a mixture of great surprise and astonishment, I have read with attention the sentiments you have submitted to my perusal. Be assured, sir, no occurrence in the course of the war has given me more painful sensations, than your information of there being such ideas existing in the army, as you have expressed, and I must view with abhorrence, and reprehend with severity.
Page 287 - ... twelve feet apart. Of late he has had the surprising sagacity to discover, that apples will make pies ; and it is a question, if, in the violence of his efforts, we do not get one of apples, instead of having both of beefsteaks. If the ladies can put up with such entertainment, and will submit to partake of it on plates, once tin but now iron (not become so by the labor of scouring), I shall be happy to see them; and am, dear Doctor, yours.
Page 390 - Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better and because I am not sure that it is not the best.
Page 61 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 511 - Tis well," said she, in the same voice, " all is now over; I shall soon follow him; I have no more trials to pass through.
Page 429 - The confidence of the whole Union is centred in you. Your being at the helm will be more than an answer to every argument, which can be used to alarm and lead the people in any quarter into violence or secession. North and south will hang together, if they have you to hang on...
Page 440 - There is a rank due to the United States among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known, that we are at all times ready for war.
Page 392 - In this conflict of emotions, all I dare aver, is, that it has been my faithful study to collect my duty from a just appreciation of every circumstance by which it might be affected.
Page 392 - I have been too much swayed by a grateful remembrance of former instances, or by an affectionate sensibility to this transcendent proof of the confidence of my fellow-citizens ; and have thence too little consulted my incapacity as well as disinclination for the weighty and untried cares before me ; my error will be palliated by the motives which misled me, and its consequences be judged by my country with some share of the partiality in which they originated.
Page 116 - I beg leave to assure the congress, that as no pecuniary consideration could have tempted me to accept this arduous employment, at the expense of my domestic ease and happiness, I do not wish to make any profit from it. I will keep an exact account of my expenses. These I doubt not, they will discharge, and that is all I desire.

Bibliographic information