A Yankee in Hokkaido: The Life of William Smith Clark

Front Cover
Lexington Books, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 306 pages
William Smith Clark was in Hokkaido for only eight months but, as John Maki's fascinating biography shows, his influence has endured. A Yankee in Hokkaido places Clark's appointment to oversee the creation of the Sapporo Agricultural College within the context of the Meiji era's drive to modernize and Westernize Japan and to settle the island of Hokkaido. Maki recounts how Clark inspired his Japanese contemporaries with an idealistic vision of the future born in the United States of the late nineteenth century; with agricultural expertise and pedagogical initiatives; and with his devotion to the moral development of his students--men who would later number among the leaders of modern Japan. The work also offers the reader an intimate portrait of this extraordinary citizen of Massachusetts from childhood through Civil War action to the founding and running of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, known today as the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The Man and the Families
1
The Making of an Academician
17
The Civil War An Interlude
57
Massachusetts Agricultural College
77
The Road to Hokkaido
117
Sapporo Agricultural College
147
The Work of Three Men
169
Voyage Home
197
From MAC to the Floating College
219
Clark Bothwell
249
Death and Heritage
281
Notes on Sources
291
Bibliography
299
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

John M. Maki is Professor Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He has taught at the University of Washington and the Unviersity of Massachusetts. He was granted an honorary LL.D. from Hokkaido University in 1976 and in 1983 was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class.

Bibliographic information