A Book for the Winter-evening Fireside

Front Cover
Ingalls & Haddock, 1858 - American wit and humor - 96 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 95 - We live in deeds, not years ; in thoughts, not breaths ; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives Who thinks most — feels the noblest — acts the best...
Page 31 - Who loved thee so fondly as he ? He caught the first accents that fell from thy tongue, And joined in thy innocent glee.
Page 95 - WE live in deeds, not years ; in thoughts, not breaths; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives, Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best. And he whose heart beats quickest lives the longest : Lives in one hour more than in years do some Whose fat blood sleeps as it slips along their veins.
Page 90 - For thou art only five feet high, And I am six feet three : I wonder, dear, how you supposed That I could look so low ; There's many a one can tie a knot, Who cannot tie a beau! Besides, you must confess, my love, The bargain's scarcely fair : For never could we make a match, Although we made a pair ; Marriage, I know, makes one of two, But there's the horrid bore, My friends decl'are if you are one, That I at least am four...
Page 90 - THE TALL GENTLEMAN'S APOLOGY. Upbraid me not ! I never swore Eternal love to thee ; For thou art only four feet high, And I am six feet three : I wonder, dear, how you supposed That I could look so low ; There's many a one can tie a knot Who cannot...

Bibliographic information