Proceedings, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them, and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Wherefore governments rather depend upon men than men upon governments. Let men be good, and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it.
Page 10 - Roman states governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them, and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Whether governments rather depend upon men than men upon governments ; let men be good, and the government cannot be bad ; if it be ill, they will cure it.
Page 22 - ... Unless we effect the separation by artificial means we encounter no purely chemical, or purely optical, or purely mechanical phenomena ; but phenomena in the production of which a variety, greater or less, of physical forces concur — that is to say, we know physical nature also through its ensemble. We are thus brought back to the point from which we started, why are we — the phenomena of social life and those of physical nature being made known to us under similar conditions — to reverse...
Page 4 - History was chosen for the subject of the first volume of this educational library because, after much observation in the schoolrooms of many of the larger cities in the eastern part of our country, the editor...
Page 6 - ... but it serves as the skeleton which the teacher is to clothe with flesh and blood. Sources have not taken the place of the text-book, but they are used to illustrate, not to reconstruct history. One of the greatest gains of the discussions of the past twenty years has been the clarification of our ideas in regard to the relation to each other of sources and text-books.
Page 53 - Committee, in which it was stated that they had examined the Report of the Treasurer, and found it correct. The...
Page 30 - Your committee unanimously support the recommendations of both the Committee of Ten and the Committee of Seven, that the course of study in history in the secondary schools should be constructed to subserve the ends for which the secondary schools exist. No pressure from the relatively few students who expect to enter college should interfere with this; no conditions imposed by the colleges should be permitted to disarrange or shorten the course in history of the greatest advantage to the future...
Page 47 - I wish those who would give three or four hours to history in the high school would sit down and make out a course of study and put it in. The Committee of Ten tried the experiment, and the result was that when they came to make out the program on the basis of their recommendations, they had more hours' work than there are hours in the week.
Page 53 - The Auditing Committee, Professors WI Hull and HV Ames, reported that they had examined the report of the Treasurer and found it correct. This report was adopted. The Committee on Nominations, Prof. EP Cheyney and Dr. JT Shotwell, reported the following nominations for officers for the ensuing...
Page 10 - Pressing home, then, a final question, we must ask what contribution we, as teachers, are personally making towards what Principal Caird has called " the other and higher function of extending the bounds of knowledge.

Bibliographic information