Ontology: The Hermeneutics of Facticity

Front Cover
Indiana University Press, 1999 - 138 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
First published in 1988 as volume 63 of his Collected Works, Ontology -- The Hermeneutics of Facticity is the text of Heidegger's lecture course at the University of Freiburg during the summer of 1923. In these lectures, Heidegger reviews and makes critical appropriations of the hermeneutic tradition from Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine to Schleiermacher and Dilthey in order to reformulate the question of being on the basis of facticity and the everyday world. Specific themes deal with the history of ontology, the development of phenomenology and its relation to Hegelian dialectic, traditional theological and philosophical concepts of man, the present situation of philosophy, and the influences of Aristotle, Luther, Kierkegaard, and Husserl on Heidegger's own thinking. Students of Heidegger will find initial breakthroughs in his unique elaboration of the meaning of human existence and the ""question of being, "" which received mature expression in Being and Time.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
3 Hermeneutics as the selfinterpretation of facticity
11
Chapter
17
5 The theological concept of man and the concept of animal rationale
21
8 Todays philosophy as an exponent of beinginterpreted in the today
32
Dialectic and phenomenology
34
Chapter Four
40
13 Further tasks of hermeneutics
50
The BeingThere of Dasein Is Being in a World
61
19 An inaccurate description of the everyday world
67
Significance as the Character of the Worlds BeingEncountered
71
25 The unpredictable and comparative
77
Inserts and Supplements
81
Signifying regarding 22
87
Endnotes on the Translation
101
GermanEnglish
127

15 Phenomenology in accord with its possibility as a how of research
58

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1999)

Martin Heidegger was born in Messkirch, Baden, Germany on September 22, 1889. He studied Roman Catholic theology and philosophy at the University of Frieburg before joining the faculty at Frieburg as a teacher in 1915. Eight years later Heidegger took a teaching position at Marburg. He taught there until 1928 and then went back to Frieburg as a professor of philosophy. As a philosopher, Heidegger developed existential phenomenology. He is still widely regarded as one of the most original philosophers of the 20th century. Influenced by other philosophers of his time, Heidegger wrote the book, Being in Time, in 1927. In this work, which is considered one of the most important philosophical works of our time, Heidegger asks and answers the question "What is it, to be?" Other books written by Heidegger include Basic Writings, a collection of Heidegger's most popular writings; Nietzsche, an inquiry into the central issues of Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy; On the Way to Language, Heidegger's central ideas on the origin, nature and significance of language; and What is Called Thinking, a systematic presentation of Heidegger's later philosophy. Since the 1960s, Heidegger's influence has spread beyond continental Europe and into a number of English-speaking countries. Heidegger died in Messkirch on May 26, 1976.

Bibliographic information