U.S. Government Publication: Ideological Development and Institutional Politics from the Founding to 1970

Front Cover
Scarecrow Press, 2005 - Political Science - 296 pages
Examines the forces that have deflected U.S. Government publication from becoming the public enterprise that Congress had conceived in the nineteenth century. Walters covers everything from the deeply embedded ideas of the American political consciousness and its inhibitive effect on the production, distribution, preservation, and quality of U.S. Government documents to reasons why the executive department circumvented the U.S. Government Printing Office to the causes behind the conspicuous lawlessness of government publication to how the folkways of science served to constrict the sphere of government publication to a narrow strip.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Ideological Heritage
1
An Informing Function Consummated 18001850
29
Toward an Ideological Underpinning for US Government Publishing 18601915
61
Institutional Tensions 19171921
93
Toy Presses and the Rise of Fugitive US Government Documents
129
Heretical Impulses The Push for a Clearinghouse 1940s and 1950s
179
The Republic of Federal Scientific Publication The NotSoPublic Domain
211
CONCLUSION
245
BIBLIOGRAPHY
249
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
285
INDEX
287
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

\John Walters serves as Department Head for Government Information/Maps, as well as Regional Depository Librarian at the Merrill Library at Utah State University in Logan, Utah.

Bibliographic information