Page images
PDF
EPUB

Total number of officials and employees in Department of Labor, July 1, 1919.

[blocks in formation]

Changes in personnel.--The following tables indicate the number of changes in personnel throughout the executive offices and bureaus of the Department during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919:

Appointments in the Department of Labor, fiscal year ended June 30, 1919.

[blocks in formation]

There was a total of 12,664 appointments during the year. This number includes every case in which an appointment certificate was issued. It will be observed that of this number there were 11,507 temporary appointments. In many cases this figure includes shortterm appointments, a large number of which were extensions, each action being considered an appointment, due to the fact that the same procedure was required in making an extension as in issuing a new appointment.

Separations and changes. There were 6,150 separations from all classes of positions. This figure indicates a very heavy turnover. However, the records show that a large number of employees were appointed for a short temporary period, and necessarily "separated" at the conclusion of the term. Many of these employees were appointed and separated five or six times during the year.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Transfers.—In the matter of transfers from the Department of Labor to other Departments and from other Departments to the Department of Labor, the figures show only slight changes, there being a total of 30 coming into the Department from other establishments and 22 going from this Department to other establishments.

The table following shows the number of transfers from and to the Department during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919:

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

DIVISION OF PUBLICATIONS AND SUPPLIES.

Printing and binding.For printing and binding for the fiscal year the sundry civil act for 1919 allotted to the Department of Labor $100,000. This was increased by an item of $30,000 in the third deficiency act, approved July 11, 1919. In addition to this amount the further sum of $274,390.77 from various lump sum appropriations, principally War Labor Administration, was expended for printing and binding. Of this latter sum, $36,740.45 was expended in the purchase of printing from establishments other than the Government Printing Office.

None of the work placed with private printers was so ordered until it had been ascertained that the Government Printing Office could not promise delivery of completed work within the time which the bureaus, offices, or services requiring the work insisted it must be done in order to be of use. All such orders were placed after competitive bids had been asked and were paid for from appropriations other than the Department's printing allotment. The Department was advised that such action was entirely within its discretion.

The amount of the printing allotment, $130,000, was apportioned as follows: Office of the Secretary.

$12, 000 Bureau of Labor Statistics.

31, 500 Bureau of Immigration...

4,500 Immigration Service.

15, 000 Children's Bureau...

18,000 Bureau of Naturalization... Naturalization Service and Examiners..

17,000 Requisitions covering the total amount of this allotment were made on the Public Printer. His bills for work done up to and including June 30, 1919, aggregated $112,412.87, leaving an unexpended balance of $17,412.23. On July 1, 1919, there remained at the Government Printing Office uncompleted and unbilled work to the estimated amount of $18,353.10, which will become a charge against the 1920 appropriation.

Printing for new bureaus.— The institution in the Department of eight new services for war activities imposed on it the duty of supplying printing for their use. This service included the preparation of copy, placing requisitions, reading proof, and frequently distribution of the finished material.

Printing and binding by bureaus.--A total of 2,959 requisitions for printing and binding were made during the year, as compared with 1,966 requisitions in 1918, an increase of 993, or about 50 per cent. The number in 1917—the last fiscal year of the prewar period—was 1,328. The increase of 1919 over 1917 was 1,631, or 122 per cent.

Of the 2,959 requisitions for printing and binding, 298 were placed with printing establishments other than the Government Printing

2,000

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Office. The total cost of this work was $36,740.45. This work included 275,000 copies of booklets, pamphlets, etc.; 8,422,898 blank forms; 100,000 circulars; 4,088,000 letterheads; 1,962,500 envelopes; 20,000 index cards; and 1,000 vertical folders.

Envelopes.-Envelope contractors received from the Department during the year 470 orders for an aggregate of 18,552,857 envelopes for the use of the various bureaus, offices, and services. In 1918 436 such orders were placed, calling for 7,400,000. These figures show an increase in 1919 of 11,154,757 envelopes, or 151 per cent. The cost of the envelopes for 1919 amounted to $39,770.06, as compared with $9,360.06 in 1918, an increase of $30,410, or about 325

per cent.

Printed stationery.—Requisitions for printed stationery to the number of 1,123 were filled during the fiscal year. Offices and bureaus of the Department in Washington received 464 of these, while 659 were supplied to the field services.

Books and blanks. Requisitions for books and blanks reached the number of 13,046, an increase of an even 3,000 over 1918. There were 194,273 shipments of books and blanks, weighing 1,022,031 pounds; shipments of supplies numbered 64,652, of an aggregate weight of 2,158,446 pounds. The total shipments reached 258,925, with an aggregate weight of 3,180,477 pounds.

In filling the 13,046 requisitions for books and blanks 22,294 books and 56,221,357 blanks were shipped, including 4,831 books aggregating 233,750 sheets of certificates of naturalization.

There were received in the shipping room 113,426 packages of blanks, weighing 1,359,448 pounds, and 25,031 packages of supplies, weighing 1,546,769 pounds.

Editorial work.-The volume of work on the editorial force has increased to such an extent that the present staff is totally inadequate. There are but two clerks assigned to editorial work, though there is more work than could be handled properly by four.

The number of folios of copy handled increased from 20,335 to 30,765 (51 per cent), the galley proofs from 3,373 to 4,870 (15 per cent), while the number of page proofs decreased from 12,139 to 11,586 (4 per cent). The decrease in the number of page proofs is accounted for by the fact that proofs were waived in numerous instances to expedite delivery of completed work. Proofs handled on miscellaneous jobs increased from 288 to 948 (230 per cent).

Distribution of publications. The distribution of publications on mailing lists and franks reached a total of 3,161,456. This number was 2,032,775 (180 per cent) more than in 1918. The number of individual franks handled in 1919 increased 20 per cent, from 109,104 in 1918 to 130,483 in the fiscal year covered by this report. Names on these mailing lists show a total of 297,985 in 1919 as compared with a total of 104,395 in 1918; an increase of 193,590, or 185 per cent. Duplicating work.-During the year 3,468 requisitions covering 6,480,584 impressions were received and handled as against 1,462 requisitions covering 1,906,315 impressions in 1918. Sheets to the number of 1,470,504 were folded as against 630,315 in the previous year. 1,232,316 envelopes were addressed as against 286,223 in 1918; 641,340 envelopes were sealed as against 427,741; and 4,174 photostatic copies made as against 2,771 during 1918. These figures show an average of approximately 200 per cent increase over the previous fiscal year.

Supplies.-Under the terms of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act approved July 3, 1918, the sum of $45,000 was appropriated for the contingent expenses of the Department. The same act also provided that a sum not in excess of $13,500 be taken from the appropriation “Expenses of regulating immigration, 1919," and added to the contingent appropriation for the purpose of providing through the central purchasing offices of the Department (Division of Publications and Supplies) certain supplies for the Immigration field service, thus making a total of $58,500 available as a contingent fund for the Department. Later, by an act approved July 11, 1919, the sum of $5,496.79 was added to the contingent appropriation of the Department, in order to enable the Department to meet the increased cost of envelopes in accordance with the adjustment made by the Postmaster General under section 4 of the Post Office appropriation act approved July 2, 1918, making a total of $63,996.79 available for the contingent expenses of the Department.

Due to the increase in cost of practically every item of supplies purchased and to the fact that not a few of the contracts made by the general supply committee, being limited to special quantities, expired before the close of the fiscal year, much of the supplies were necessarily purchased in the open market, and it was only by practicing the most rigid economy that the Department was able to meet and supply the needs of its several bureaus and offices from this appropriation.

There were filled during the fiscal year a total of 4,084 requisitions for supplies which called for the placing of 6,094 orders, involving 8,456 items at an aggregate cost of $48,002.10. At the present time there remains a balance of $2,494.68, available to meet such outstanding liabilities as may be properly chargeable to this appropriation, and which is estimated to be sufficient for that purpose.

Contingent, 1920.-Congress has provided in the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act approved March 1, 1919, the sum of $50,000 for the contingent expenses of the Department during the fiscal year 1920. This sum together with the usual allotment of $13,500 from the appropriation "Expenses of regulating immigration, 1920," makes available a total contingent fund amounting to $63,500.

« PreviousContinue »