Lectures on Biology: Biology I. Its History and Present Domain. II. Its Relations to Geology. III. Its Value as a Study. IV. Its Growth and Future Influence

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - The sixth, and of creation last, arose With evening harps and matin; when God said, Let the Earth bring forth soul living in. her kind, Cattle, and creeping things, and beast of the Earth, Each in their kind.
Page 95 - Abiogenesis ever has taken place in the past or ever will take place in the future. With organic chemistry, molecular physics, and physiology yet in their infancy, and every day making prodigious strides, I think it would be the height of presumption for any man to say that the conditions under which matter assumes the properties we call " vital " may not, some day, be artificially brought together.
Page 19 - As from his lair the wild beast where he wons In" forest wild, in thicket, brake, or den...
Page 96 - ... be a witness of the evolution of living protoplasm from not living matter. I should expect to see it appear under forms of great simplicity, endowed, like existing fungi, with the power of determining the formation of new protoplasm from such matters as ammonium carbonates, oxalates and tartrates, alkaline and earthy phosphates, and water, without the aid of light. That is the expectation to which analogical reasoning leads me ; but I beg you once more to recollect that I have no right to call...
Page 19 - The tawny lion, pawing to get free His hinder parts, then springs, as broke from bonds, And rampant shakes his brinded mane ; the ounce. The libbard, and the tiger, as the mole Rising, the crumbled earth above them threw In hillocks : the swift stag from under ground Bore up his branching head...
Page 8 - The register of knowledge of fact is called history :. Whereof there be two sorts: one called natural history, which is the history of such facts, or effects of nature, as have no dependence on man's mill, such as are the histories of metals, plants, animals, regions, and the like. The other is civil history, which is the history of the voluntary actions of men in commonwealths.
Page 95 - ... may not, some day, be artificially brought together. All I feel justified in affirming is, that I see no reason for believing that the feat has been performed yet. And, looking back through the prodigious vista of the past, I find no record of the commencement of life, and therefore I am devoid of any means of forming a definite conclusion as to the conditions of its appearance.
Page 95 - But expectation is permissible where belief is not ; and, if it were given me to look beyond the abyss of geologically recorded time to the still more remote period when the earth was passing through physical -and chemical conditions, which it can no more see again than a man...
Page 18 - Organic life beneath the shoreless waves Was born and nurs'd in Ocean's pearly caves; First forms minute, unseen by spheric glass, Move on the mud or pierce the watery mass; These, as successive generations bloom, New powers acquire, and larger limbs assume; Whence countless groups of vegetation spring, And breathing realms of fin, and feet, and wing.
Page 98 - Leave out the Physiological sciences from your curriculum, and you launch the student into the world, undisciplined in that science whose subject-matter would best develop his powers of observation ; ignorant of facts of the deepest importance for his own and others' welfare ; blind to the richest sources of beauty in God's creation ; and unprovided with that belief in a living law, and an order manifesting itself in and through endless change and variety, which might serve to check and moderate...

Bibliographic information