Page images
PDF
EPUB

the bar, this meeting being of opinion that the resolution advanced Liberal, although on such questions as the of the Inng of Court should not be accepted, but that abolition of church rates, and marriage with & deceased colicitors should have facilities for call to the bar equal to wife's sister, his views differed from those of his those already given to the members of the bar for party. At the general election of 1847 he was admission to the roll of solicitors,"

elected M.P. for the city of Oxford. He gave a Mr. F. MILLER seconded the amendment.

steady support to the Government of Lord John Russell, Mr. BOLTON asked whether the suggestion that soli- and in 1851, when Sir John Romilly became Master of the eitors who wished to go to the bar should be divided into Rolls, and Sir Alexander Cockbura Attorney-General, he two classes—those who had passed the preliminary exami. was appointed Solicitor-General, and received the honour of nation and those who had not-came from the council or knighihood. His career as a law officer was, however, a from the Inns of Court? He asked this, not only in the very short one, for in February, 1852, he retired with his interest of those solicitors who had obtained dispensing party. In the following December, on the formation of the orders, but also of the senior members of the profession Earl of Aberdeen's Government, Lord Clanworth became who had entered it before the institution of the preliminary Lord Chancellor, and Sir George Turner Lord Justice of examination.

Appeal, and Sir W. P. Wood was appointed a Vice-ChanMr, Mason said that the council had rather helped the cellor. He held that office for over fifteen years, and barristers than the solicitors in their endeavours for several achieved a very high judicial reputation. His judgments years. He urged that the solicitors should make greater (which are to be found in “ Kay and Johnson," " Johnson use of the influence they possessed in the House of and Hemming," “Hemming and Miller," and the earlier Commons and elsewhere.

volumes of the Law Reports) were very seldon reversed on Mr. R. TODD spoke of the want of efficient arrangements | appoal. He was a member of the Chancery Procedure for the distribution of stamps, due, as he believed, to some Commission and the Cambridge University Commission, and extent, to the fact that the commission at one time allowed he was also one of the arbitrators between ber Majesty and to law stationers on their sale had been withdrawn. He gave the late King of Hanover in respect of the disputed claims an instance where he went to the county court at Wands. to the Hanover Crown jewels. In February, 1868, on Lord worth to file a petition in bankruptcy, and the £5 stamp Cairns becoming Lord Chancellor, Sir W. P. Wood received which was necessary could not be procured nearer than from his political opponents the appointment of Lord Justice London, where he was obliged to send a messenger, involv. of Appeal, and was sworn as a member of the Privy Couning a waste of a couple of hours. It was very desirable cil. The appointment gave very great satisfaction to the that this defect should be remedied. He asked why some profession, and Sir Charles Selwyn, who had been appointed arrangement could not be made for informing the solicitor | a lord justice a few weeks earlier, waived his right to prewhen a judge would not attend at chambers ? He had | cedence. Sir W. P. Wood did not long occupy this office, recently had a case in which, when he attended on the for in the following December, on the formation of Mr. Saturday at chambers, he found that there was no judge, Gladstone's first administration, he accepted the Great Seal, but a notice to the effect that summonses set down for | and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron hearing on that day would have precedence on the following Hatherley. He was a frequent speaker in the House of Monday. If a solicitor's time was to be wasted in this Lords when on the woolsack, for it became his duty to deway, the client would naturally have to pay for it.

fend the provisions of the Irish Church and Land Bills, and Mr. FRANCIS MILLER said that there were many matters the arrangements of the Alabama Treaty. Lord Hatherley in the report which the members would like to have an was less successful as a legislator than as a judge. He passed opportunity of discussing, and a late hour had now been the Bankruptcy Act of 1869 and the Judicial Committee reached. He moved the adjournment of the meeting until Act of 1871, but be failed to carry a Judicature Bill. In the following Friday (yesterday).

October, 1872, in consequence of the weakness of his sight, Mr. F. K. MUNTON seconded the motion, which was he resigned the Great Seal to Lord Selborne, but he continued carried.

to be most conscientious in his attendance on the hearing of A motion by Mr. MILLER, seconded by Mr. KIMBER, appeals in the House of Lords. He sat for the last time at that the hour of meeting be seven p.m. was proposed, to the end of July, 1880, and at the commencement of the which an amendment by Mr. TodD was moved, and present session he intimated to Lord Selborne that he felt seconded by Mr. PAINE, that the hour be two p.m. The no longer equal to the performance of judicial duties. All amendment was carried, and was then adopted as a sub his judgments were most carefully reasoned, although he stantive motion.

erred on the side of diffuseness, and his style of expression was not a little involved ; and it was often renarked that he owed much to the reporters. Lord Hatherley was a liberal supporter of the leading Church societies, and

took an active part in charitable and religious undertakings OBITUARY.

in the city of Westminster. For many years he regularly

taught in St. Margaret's Sunday-schools, and he was one of LORD HATHERLEY,

the chief founders of the Westminster Free Library. He

published, some years ago, a work on “ The Continuity of The Right Hon. William Page Wood, Lord Hatherley, Scripture." Lörd Hatherley was married to a daughter of formerly Lord High Chancellor of England, died at bis resi- | Major Edward Moore, but he became & widower in 1878. dence, Great George-street, Westminster, on the 9th inst., in He leaves no family, and the title becomes extinct. his eightieth year. Lord Hatherley was the second son of Alderman Sir Matthew Wood, who was twice Lord Mayor of London, and was created a baronet in 1837, his mother having been a davghter of Dr. John Page, of Woodbridge,

MR. R. K. RODWELL. Suffolk. He was born in 1801, and was educated at Win-1 Mr. Robert Kedington Rodwell, barrister, of No. 7, Newchester. Having spent several months studying at Geneva, square, Livcoln's.inn, died very suddenly on Sunday, July 3, he proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge, of which society at his father's house in Bury St. Edmuuds, aged thirty-four he was soccessively scholar and fellow, and he graduated as

years. He was the eldest son of Mr. Robert Rodwell of that twenty-fourth wrangler in 1824. Soon after taking bis

town, and was educated at Bury School and Emmanuel College, degree, he entered at Lincoln's-inn, and was a pupil of the

nu, and was a pupil of the Cambridge. After a distinguished university career be took late Mr. Roupell (who was afterwards & master in chancery),

ards & master in chancery), his B.A. degree in 1869, being seventh in the first class of and subsequently of Mr. Job Tyrrell, the well-known con the classical tripos, seventeenth senior optime, and second veyancer. He was called to the bar in 1827, and soon guc Chancellor's medaliist. He was shortly afterwards elected to ceeded in obtaining business, both as a conveyancer and ag a fellowship at bis college. He was called to the bar in an equity draftsman, as well as before Parliamentary Com.

Trinity Term, 1874, and practised as a conveyancer and mittees. In 1845, be received a silk gown from Lord Lyod.

equity draftsman. He was one of the commissioners burst, and he then selected for practice the Court of Vice

chosen to represent his college at the sitriogs of the CamChancellor Wigram, in which he speedily became one of the bridge University Commissioners, leaders. In 1849, he received from Lord Campbell, then Chancellor of the Duchy, the appointment of Vice-Cbancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster, which office he held for only two years. Mr. Wood's politics were those of an

have only two representatives whilst the bar had no less be so remunerated. In bis own experience the taxing masters than thirteen ? The solicitors had reports of their own in were always inclined to consider the length of documents in the SOLICITORS' JOURNAL and other legal publioations, and their allowances. The present state of the taxing office was what power would the two solicitors possess in the presence a scandal, especially in the Chancery Division. A few days of the thirteen barristers ? He would be glad to know if | since he had left a bill for taxation and had been told it the council had had under their consideration the subject of was impossible to give an appointment until after the the accommodation of solicitors in waiting-rooms at the long vacation. He thought the council would be better new Law Courts? In the chambers of Vice-Chancellor occupied in considering such questions as these than in Hall there were two rooms for the accommodation of the dealing with subjects which concerned the far fature. bar on the first floor and one on the second, whilst there with regard to the division of the two branches of the was only one room for solicitors, which was on the second | legal profession, he asserted that economy in procedure floor. Considering that solicitors and their clerks were would never be accomplished until there was a fusion constantly attending before the judges, and that they were between the two branches, and he was sure that time twenty times as numerous as barristers, better accommoda would arrive. Although he congratulated the council tion ought to be provided.

upon the steps they had taken for facilitating the call Mr. PARKER bad put a question three years ago to the of solicitors to the bar, yet he grieved when he saw that then president as to whether the council could not make they considered the resolution which had been arrived at arrangements to hold the examination in some other place | to be satisfactory. It was still necessary that solicitors or building, so that the library might not be closed to the should spend four terms and pass an examination. This members every now and again. Or the council might find | was not a satisfactory termination of the question. it convenient to hold the examination on several days, for Mr. J. A. Rose regretted the manner in which the there was no reason why the members of the society should books in the library were spoilt by the writing in them of be excluded from the enjoyment of the library. At all times insolent remarks by the students. He was opposed to the students occupied the greater part of the library and of rendering the access of solicitors to the bar so easy, and the books, and he looked upon this as a present and could not see any objection to the keeping of the four a greatly increasing evil which would be felt to a yet terms which was required. Did they wish that gentlegreater extent when the new Law Courts were opened, men should be solicitors one day, barristers the next, and and a greater number of solicitors would be brought to the solicitors again the day after, so that they would become building, both in London and from the country. The perambulating nuisances? He could not agree in abusing students, as a body of strangers, bad no right whatever to the late Chief Baron of the Exchequer because he had turn the members out of their own library, and they were smoothed the way for respectable solicitors' clerks to gradually making it a study of their own, not merely com become solicitors. Some of the best and most honourable ing there to read the books to be found in the library, but solicitors he had ever met had risen from the lowest ranks bringing their own text-books and passing the day in read of the profession, and he could not see why their course ing them. This was not putting the library to its legitimate should not be facilitated. They certainly ought not to have use, and was very much to the inconvenience of the members any slur put upon them as was done in the report. Re. who had occasion to resort to it. He would venture to sug. | ferring to the encounter which had taken place between gest that it might be possible to exclude the students alto. the solicitors and the Attorney-General, in which the gether from the library. There was an examination hall in council, having the better case, had conducted it so mag. the building in which they might be accommodated, and the nificently that at the end they had to apologize, he said library could then be retained for the enjoyment of the they had now transferred the quarrel from the barrister members, He believed that if the council were to consult to his clerk, and were objecting to his fees. He had never Mr. Busk and the examiners they would find that the number heard a client say one word against the 2s. 6d. to be paid of books used by the students would be about one hundred, to the clerk, but had heard a good deal said against the and these could easily be supplied in the examination hall. guineas paid to the barrister. Another cause of complaint was that the students made Mr. J. E. Fox expressed his satisfaction with the marks in the books occasionally, and damaged them in a í report, but observed that, as the society had permitted a way that ought not to be. It should be remembered that Bill to pass enabling the barrister of five years' standing, whilst the bar bad four good libraries, the solicitors of Eng- on being disbarred, and passing the society's final examinland had only one, and that was closed upon examination ation, to be finrolled as a solicitor, should not be satisfied days, and at other times only one-third was open to them. with a result which placed the solicitor at a greater disadThe solicitors flung back upon the bar all suggestions of vantage. The council had prepared a Bill for the purpose inferiority or want of dignity, and yet they did not possess a of facilitating the call of solicitors to the bar, and the proper library. He would be glad to know whether the bar, wishing to prevent its passing, had effected a comcouncil would object to the appointment of a library com. promise, by which a solicitor of not less than five years' mittee, with two of tbe outside members who really used the practice might, after keeping four terms, and having passed library and took an interest in it ?

the bar final examination, be called to the bar. The report Mr. JoAN INDERMAUR quite agreed that the closing of told them that “the council had hoped to get rid of the the library on examination days was a source of great dis

interval altogether, but with the uncertainty as to the result comfort to the members and their articled clerks. It was also of their Bill in Parliament, they considered that it would be most unnecessarily closed on days when dinners took place. prudent to accept the resolution of the Inps of Court." He, however, altogether disagreed with the remarks which In connection with this subject, there was a suggestion as had been made with respect to the students. A large part of to preliminary examination; and, if the council accepted the income of the society was derived from the students, and that resolution, all solicitors who had not passed the they were the only people who ever used the library in a preliminary examination of the Incorporated Law Society, grateful and useful manner. The members visited it in a no matter how they might have been exempted from it, mere casual way, but many of the students derived the would be prevented from going to the bar. This was greatest advantage from it. They no doubt were in the not right or just, as many solicitors had passed the babit of bringing tbeir text-books to the library, but it was Oxford or Cambridge local examinations, an 1 some necessary for them to refer to reports and statutes which, as a bad obtained degrees, whilst others had been exempted, matter of course, they would not have an opportunity of and the solicitors ought to have equal advantages doing in their own chambers. His own experience as a with the members of the bar. As regarded the audience student kad always been that, when a solicitor came into the l of solicitors, the Bankruptcy Act had admitted that library and required a book which was in the hands of solicitors were qualified to have audience in the Bank. a student, it was taken away from the student and / ruptcy Court, and, if this were the case in that court, given to the member. There was an admirable idea in why should they not be qualified to have audience in the report with respect to the remuneration of solicitors, wbich the other courts? He would observe, with regard to the the council were of opiniou should be “according to the skill, | library, that the bye-laws concerning it were not carried knowledge, and exertion which he employs in the busine-8. I out. There was a bye-law that none but members should and according to the importance and his consequent respon | be admitted, and if this was not carried out in its sibility, and not according to the time employed, the length 1 entirety, at any rate the students should be restricted to of documents prepared, or the number of letters or confer. | the further end of the library. He moved, as an amend; ences.” He thought this a mere idle formula, and that ment, “That the report be received, with the exception of Bolicitors would never arrive at that period when they would l that part thereof which relates to the call of solicitors to

the bar, this meeting being of opinion that the resolution advanced Liberal, although on such questions as the of the Inns of Court should not be accepted, but that abolition of church rates, and marriage with a deceased colicitors should have facilities for call to the bar equal to wife's sister, his views differed from those of his those already given to the members of the bar for party. At the general election of 1847 he was admission to the roll of solicitors.”

elected M.P. for the city of Oxford. He gave & Mr. F. MILLER seconded the amendment.

steady support to the Government of Lord John Russell, Mr. BOLTON asked whether the suggestion that soli and in 1851, when Sir John Romilly became Master of the eitors who wished to go to the bar should be divided into Rolls, and Sir Alexander Cockburn Attorney-General, he two classes—those who had passed the preliminary exami. was appointed Solicitor-General, and received the honour of nation and those who had not-came from the council or knighthood. His career as a law officer was, however, a from the Ions of Court? He asked this, not only in the very short one, for in February, 1852, he retired with his interest of those solicitors who had obtained dispensing | party. In the following December, on the formation of the orders, but also of the senior members of the profession Earl of Aberdeen's Government, Lord Cianworth became who had entered it before the institution of the preliminary Lord Chancellor, and Sir George Turner Lord Justice of examination,

Appeal, and Sir W. P. Wood was appointed a Vice-ChanMr. MASON said that the council had rather helped the cellor. He held that office for over fifteen years, and barristers than the solicitors in their endeavours for several achieved a very high judicial reputation. His judgments years. He urged that the solicitors should make greater | (which are to be found in “ Kay and Johnson," " Johnson use of the influence they possessed in the House of and Hemming," “Hemming and Miller," and the earlier Commons and elsewhere.

volumes of the Law Reports) were very seldon reversed on Mr. R. TODD spoke of the want of efficient arrangements appeal. He was a member of the Chancery Procedure for the distribution of stamps, due, as he believed, to some Commission and the Cambridge University Commission, and extent, to the fact that the commission at one time allowed he was also one of the arbitrators between ber Majesty and to law stationers on their sale had been withdrawn. He gave the late King of Hanover in respect of the disputed claims an instance where he went to the county court at Wands- to the Hanover Crown jewels. In February, 1868, on Lord worth to file a petition in bankruptcy, and the £5 stampCairns becoming Lord Chancellor, Sir W. P. Wood received which was necessary could not be procured nearer than from his political opponents the appointment of Lord Justice London, where he was obliged to send a messenger, involv. | of Appeal, and was sworn as a member of the Privy Couning a waste of a couple of hours. It was very desirable cil. The appointment gave very great satisfaction to the that this defect should be remedied. He asked why some profession, and Sir Charles Selwyn, who had been appointed arrangement could not be made for informing the solicitor a lord justice a few weeks earlier, waived his right to prewhen a judge would not attend at chambers? He had cedence. Sir W. P. Wood did not long occupy this office, recently had a case in which, when he attended on the for in the following December, on the formation of Mr. Saturday at chambers, he found that there was no judge, Gladstone's first administration, he accepted the Great Seal, but a notice to the effect that summonses set down for and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron hearing on that day would have precedence on the following Hatherley. He was a frequent speaker in the House of Monday. If a solicitor's time was to be wasted in this Lords when on the woolsack, for it became his duty to deway, the client would naturally have to pay for it.

fend the provisions of the Irish Church and Land Bills, and Mr. FRANCIS MILLER said that there were many matters the arrangements of the Alabama Treaty. Lord Hatherley in the report which the members would like to have an was less successful as a legislator than as a judge. He passed opportunity of discussing, and a late hour had now been the Bankruptcy Act of 1869 and the Judicial Committee reached. He moved the adjournment of the meeting until Act of 1871, but be failed to carry a Judicature Bill. In the following Friday (yesterday).

October, 1872, in consequence of the weakness of his sight, Mr. F. K. MUNTON seconded the motion, which was he resigned the Great Seal to Lord Selborne, but he continued carried.

to be most conscientious in his attendance on the hearing of A motion by Mr. MILLER, seconded by Mr. KIMBER, I appeals in the House of Lords. He sat for the last time at that the hour of meeting be seven p.m. was proposed, to the end of July, 1880, and at the commencement of the which an amendment by Mr. TODD was moved, and present session he intimated to Lord Selborne that he felt -seconded by Mr. PAINE, that the hour be two p.m. The no longer equal to the performance of judicial duties. All amendment was carried, and was then adopted as a sub bis judgments were most carefully reasoned, although he stantive motion.

erred on the side of diffuseness, and his style of expression was not a little involved ; and it was often remarked that he owed much to the reporters. Lord Hatherley was a liberal supporter of the leading Church societies, and took an active part in charitable and religious undertakings in the city of Westminster. For many years he regularly

taught in St. Margaret's Sunday-schools, and he was one of LORD HATHERLEY,

the chief founders of the Westminster Free Library. He

published, some years ago, a work on “ The Continuity of The Right Hon. William Page Wood, Lord Hatherley,

Scripture." Lörd Hatherley was married to a daughter of formerly Lord High Chancellor of England, died at bis resi.

Major Edward Moore, but he became a widower in 1878. dence, Great George-street, Westminster, on the 9th inst., in He leaves no family, and the title becomes extinct. his eightieth year. Lord Hatherley was the second son of Alderman Sir Matthew Wood, who was twice Lord Mayor of London, and was created a baronet in 1837, his mother having been a davghter of Dr. John Page, of Woodbridge,

MR. R. K. RODWELL. Suffolk. He was born in 1801, and was educated at Win

Mr. Robert Kedington Rodwell, barrister, of No. 7, Newchester. Having spent several months studying at Geneva, square, Livcoln's inn, died very suddenly on Sunday, July 3, he proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge, of which society

at his father's house in Bury St. Edmuuds, aged thirty-four he was successively scholar and fellow, and he graduated as

years. He was the eldest son of Mr. Robert Rodwell of that twenty-fourth wrangler in 1824. Soon after taking bis

town, and was educated at Bury School and Emmanuel College, degree, he entered at Lincoln's-inn, and was & pupil of the Cambridge. After a distinguished university career be took late Mr. Roupell (who was afterwards a master in chancery), his B.A. degree in 1869, being seventh in the first class of and subseqoently of Mr. Joba Tyrrell, the well-known con the classical tripos, seventeenth senior optime, and second veyancer. He was called to the bar in 1927, and soon suc Chancellor's medaliist. He was shortly afterwards elected to ceeded in obtaining business, both as a conveyancer and as a fellowship at his college. He was called to the bar in an equity draftsman, as well as before Parliamentary Com.

Trinity Term, 1874, and practised as a conveyancer and uittees. In 1845, he received a silk gown from Lord Lynd

equity draftsman. He was one of the commissioners hurst, and be then selected for practice the Court of Vice. chosen to represent his college at the sittiogs of the CamChancellor Wigram, in wbich he speedily became one of the bridge University Commissioners. leaders. In 1849, he received from Lord Campbell, then Chancellor of the Duchy, the appointment of Vice-Chancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster, which office he held for only two years. Mr. Wood's politics were those of an

OBITUARY.

in the Court of Appeal, continue to be and to act as a jadge PENDING LEGISLATION.

of the High Court of Justice, and shall be capable of performing and liable to perform all duties which he would

have been capable of performing and liable to perform, is SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE ACT

pursuance of any Act of Parliament, law, or custom, if this AMENDMENT.

Act had not passed, and shall not be bound to give attend. A Bill intituled An Act to amend the Supreme Court of ance in the Court of Appeal at any time when his presence Judicature Acts; and for other purposes.

elsewhere is necessary for the due discharge of the business Whereas it is expedient to amend the constitution of her of the said High Court, or of any commission of assize, or of Majesty's Court of Appeal, and to make further provision oyer and terminer or gaol delivery. concerning the Supreme Court of Judicature and the officers The provisions of the Supreme Court of Judicatare Act, thereof, and such other matters as are hereinafter mentioned: 1875, section five, as to the tenare of the office of judge Be it enacted, &c.

shall not apply (so far as pelates to the Court of Appeal 1. Short title.) This Act may be cited as the Supreme

to any judge so selected as aforesaid ; and the power for Court of Judicature, Act 1881.

an additional judge or additional judges to attend in the 2. Master of the Rolls to be Judge of Appeal only.] From

Court of Appeal on the request of the Lord Chancellor, and after the passing of this Act the present and every future

given by the same section of the last-mentioned Aot, is Master of the Rolls shall cease to be a judge of her Majesty's

hereby repealed. Section nineteen of the Appellate JarisHigh Court of Justice, but shall continue by virtue of his

diction Act, 1876, shall apply to any judge of the Court of office to be a judge of her Majesty's Court of Appeal, and

Appeal selected under this Act. shall retain the same rank, title, salary, right of pension,

6. New judge of High Court instead of Master of the Rolls.) patronage, and powers of appointment or dismissal, and all other It shall be lawfal for her Majesty to sapply the vacancy powers, privileges, and disqualifications now and heretofore in the High Court of Justice, to be occasioned by the belonging to the said office of Master of the Rolls, and all removal therefrom of the Master of the Rolls, by the apother duties of the said office except that of a judge of her pointment, immediately after the passing of this Act, and Majesty's High Court of Justice : Provided that the present from time to time afterwards, of a judge, who shall be in Master of the Rolls shall not by virtue of this Act be subject the same position as if he had been appointed & puisne to any disqualification to wbich he is not by law now subject, judge of the said High Court in pursuance of the Jadicapor shall be required to act under any commission of assize, ture Acts, 1873 and 1875; and all the provisions of the Nisi Prius, oyer and terminer, or gaol delivery ; and the Sapreme Court of Judicature Acts, 1873 and 1875, existing personal officers of the Master of the Rolls shall for the time being in force in relation to the continue to be attached to him and be under his authority, qualification and appointment of poisne judges and to hold their respective offices upon the same tenure of the said High Court, and to their duties and tenure and in the same manner in all respects as if of office, and to their precedence, and to their salaries and this Act had not passed: Provided also, that any pensions, and to the officers to be attached to the persons of Master of the Rolls to be hereafter appointed shall such judges, and all other provisions relating to such paisne be under an obligation to go circuits and to act as a com | judges, or any of them, with the exception of such provisions missioner ander commissions of assize, or other commis as apply to existing judges only, shall apply to the sions authorized to be issued in pursuance of the Supreme judge appointed in pursuance of this section, in the same Court of Judicature Act, 1873, in the same manner in all manner as they apply to the other puisne judges of the said respects as if he were a judge of the High Court of High Court respectively. The judge so appointed shall be Jastice.

| attached to the Chancery Division of the said High Court, 3. Existing vacancy in Court of Appeal not to be filled

subject to such power of transfer as is in the Supreme Court up.] Tbe vacancy now existing among the ordinary judges

of Judicature Act, 1873, mentioned. of the said Court of Appeal shall not be filled up, and the

7. Judge under Judicature Act, 1877.] The power given to namber of ordinary judges of that court shall henceforth

| her Majesty by the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, 1877, be five.

to appoint a judge of the High Court of Justice in addition

to the number of judges authorized to be appointed by the 4. President of Probate Division to be an ex officio

Supreme Court of Judicature Acts, 1873 and 1875, may be Judge of Court of Appeal.] The President for the time

exercised by her Mjesty from time to time, so as at all times to being of the Probate, Divorce and Admiralty Division of

make due provision for the business of the Chancery Division the High Court of Justice shall henceforth be an ex officio

of the High Court of Justice : Provided that no such ap. judge of her Majesty's Court of Appeal with the same pointment shall be made unless or until the number of judges powers, and in the game manner in all respects as the other attached for the time being to the Chancery Division of the ex officio judges thereof.

High Court, orber than the Lord Chancellor, is, by death, 5. Three puisne judges to sit in Court of Appeal 1 In

resignation, or otherwise, reduced below five. addition to the ex officio jadges and the ordinary judges 8. Rolls Court Chambers and clerks, &c.] The Lord of the said Court of Appeal, three of the puisne judges of Chancellor shall have power by order uader his band to direct the High Court of Justice, to be selected annually as here that the court and chambers beretofore used by the Master inafter provided, shall be judges of the Court of Appeal of the Rolls as a judge of the Chancery Division of the with the same powers as the other judges thereof. For High Court of Justice, shall (so long as may be necessary or the purposes of this Act, every judge of the Higb Court, con venient) be used by such judge of the said Chancery who is not an ex officio judge of the Court of Appeal, Division of the said High Court as shall be in any such shall be deemed to be a poigne judge of the said High order in that behalf named ; and the chief and other clerks, Court,

and other officers, heretofore attached to the said court and Such three judges shall be selected in manner following; chambers respectively, shall (subject to any rules or orders that is to say, on or before the fourth day of November next of court) be and continue attached to the judge to be after the passing of this Act, and from time to time on or be. named in any such order, and, after such court and chamfore the same day in every succeeding year, the judges of the bers shall have ceased to be so used, to the judge to whom said High Court sball, by a majority of votes, nominate the business previously transacted in such court and cham. three of the puispe judges of the said High Court to serve bers respectively shall be for the time being assigned. in the Court of Appeal during the twelve months commenc 9. Title of Justices.] And whereas it is expedient to amend ing on such fourth day of November and ending on the section four of the Supreme Court of Judicatare Act, 1877: third day of November then next ensuing. If, in any case, | Be it enacted that the exception of Presidents of divisions the judges present at any meeting held for the purpose of l from the enactment that the judges of the High Court of such selection are equally divided in the choice of any judge, Justice shall be styled justices of the High Court shall not the judge then present, who is senior in rank or precedence, | apply to any judge to be hereafter appointed who may be or sball have a second or casting vote. The choice of a judge to | become Pr-sident of the Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty fill any occasional vacancy occurring during any current Division of the High Court of Justice. year by the death, resignation, or removal from office of any 10. Appeals under Divorce Act.1 All appeals which, under judge so selected, until the end of such current year, shall / section filty-five of the Act of the twentieth and twentybe made in like manner.

first years of her present Majesty, chupter eighty-five, or Every judge so selected shall, notwithstanding bis service under any other Act, might be brought to the full court established by the said first-mentioned Act, shall henceforth The Winter Assizas Act, 1877, and section 2 of the be brought to her Maj-sty's Court of Appeal and not to the Spring Assizes Act, 1879, are hereby repealed, with. said full court, and the decision thereon of the said Court of out prejudice to anything done in pursuance of those enactAppeal shall be final, except in those cases in which it is by ments. the same or any other Act provided that an appeal shall lie 16. Presentation and swearing of Lord Mayor of London.] from a decision of the said full court to the House of Lords, The proceedings for the ordaining or nominating of sheriffs, in which cases an appeal shall lie, in the same manner and directed by an Act passed in the fourteenth year of King under the same conditions, from her Majesty's Court of Edward the First, intituled “How long a Sheriff shall Appeal to the House of Lords.

tarry in his Office," and by another Act passed in the 11. Apreal against decrees nisi for dissolution or nullity of twenty-fourth year of King George the Second, intituled harriage] Any party dissatisfied with a decree nisi for dis

An Act for the abbreviation of Michaelmas Term," solution or pallity of marriage pronounced under the Acts to take place at the Exchequer, shall henceforth in every relating to divorce and matrimonial causes in England shall year take place in the Queen's Bench Division of the High henceforth have the same right of appeal against such Court of Justice, at the same time and in the same decree, within the same time and subject to the same con

manner as bath been heretofore accustomed in the Court of ditions, as is given by the Divorce Amendment Act, 1868, Exchequer. to a party dissatisfied with the final decision of the court on

17. Proceedings with regard to nomination of sheriffs.) a petition for dissolution or nullity of marriage ; and no The presentation and swearing of the Lord Mayor of the appeal from an order absolute for such dissolution or nullity city of London, which has heretofore taken place in the shall henceforth lie in favour of any party who, baving had Court of Exchequer at Westminster after every appual time and opportunity under this Act to appeal from the election into that office, pursuant to charters granted by decree nisi on which such order may be founded, shall not her Majesty's Royal Predecessors to the citizens of Lonhave appealed therefrom.

don, and to the bereinbefore recited Act of King George 12. Qualifications of judges to sit on appeals.] A judge

the Second, sball henceforth take place in the Queen's who was not present and acting as a member of a divi. Bench Division of ber Majesty's High Court of Justice, or sional court of the High Court of Justice, at the time when before the judges of that division, at the same time and any decision which may be appealed from was made, or at in the same manner as hath been heretofore accustomed in the argument of the case desided, shall not, for the purposes the Court of Exchequer. of the fourth section of the Sapreme Court of Jadicatare

18. As to fixing Sessions of Central Criminal Court.) Act, 1875, be deemed to be, or to have been, a member of The power of making general orders for fixing the times such divisional court.

of holding sessions of the Central Criminal Court esta b. 13. Selection of judges for trial of election petitions.] The lished by the Act of the fourth and fifth years of King judges to be placed on the rota for the trial of election William the Fourth, chapter thirty-six, which by section petitions in England in each year, under the provisions of

| fifteen of that Act was given to any eight or more of the the Parliamentary Elections Act, 1868, or any Aot amending judges of the Saperior Courts at Westminster, may the same, shall benceforth be selected out of the judges of henceforth be exercised from time to time by any foor or the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of Justice in

more of the judges of her Majesty's High Court of Jussuch manner as may be provided by any Rules of Court to tice. be made for tbat purpose ; and, subject thereto, shall be 19. Power to make rules under Appellate Jurisdiction selected as follows; (that is to say,) the judges of the Act, 1876.] The power of making Rules of Court, conQueen's Bench Division of the said High Court shall, on or

erred by section seventeen of the Appellete Jurisdiction before the fourth day of November in every year, select, by

Act, 1876, upon the several judges therein mentioned, a majority of votes, three of the paisne judges of such sball henceforth be vested in and exercised by any five or division (none of whom sball be a member of the House of more of the following persons, of whom the Lord Chan. Lorde) to be placed on the rota for the trial of election cellor shall be one ; namely, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord petitions during the ensuing year.

Chief Justice of England, the Master of the Rolls, the If in any case the judges of the said division, present President of the Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty Diviat the time of their meeting to make such selection, are sion of the High Court of Justice, and four other judges equally divided in their ohoice of any judge to be placed on

of the Sapreme Court of Judicature to be from time to the rota, the Lord Chief Justice of England, or in case of

time appointed for the purpose by the Lord Chancellor in his absence, the senior judge then present, shall have a

writing under his band, such appointment to continge for second or casting vote.

such time as shall be specified therein. The choice of a judge to fill any occasional vacancy apon 20. The power and right of filling any vacancy in the the rota, or to assist the judge on the rota as an additional

office of master of the Supreme Court, or in any olerkship judge, sball be made in like manner.

in the Central Office by section pine of the Supreme The judges, who at the time of the passing of this Act | Court of Judicature (Officers') Act, 1879, vested, subject shall be upon the rota for the trial of election petitions, as therein mentioned, in tbe Lord Chief Justice of Eogshall continge upon such rota until the end of the year land, the Master of the Rolls, the Lord Chief Justice of for wbich they have been appointed, in the same manner the Common Pleas, and the Lord Chief Baron of the as if this Act had not passed.

Exchequer, in rotation and in such order as they, by 14. Jurisdiction of High Court in registration and election agreement among themselves, might determine, shall benoecases.] The jurisdiotion of the High Court of Justice to forth be vested, subject as in the same Act mentioned, decide questions of law, apon appeal or otberwise, under in the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice of Engthe Act of the sixth and seventh years of her Majesty, land, and the Master of the Rolls in rotation or in such chapter eighteen, the County Voters Ragistration Act, order or manner as they by agreement among themselves 1865, the Parliamentary Elections Act, 1868, the Corrapt may determine : Provided, that if any master or prin. Practices (Municipal Elections) Act, 1872, the Parlia cipal officer, whose duties for the time being may have mentary and Municipal Registration Act, 1878, or any of relation solely or obiefly to the Queen's Bench Division of the said Acts, or any Act amending the same respectively, the High Ctort of Justice, shall be appointed by the sball henceforth be final and conclasive, apless in any Lord Chancellor or the Master of the Rolle, such appointcase it shall seem fit to the said High Court to give special ment shall be made with the concurrence of the Lord leave to appeal therefrom to her Majesty's Court of Chief Justice of Eogland, and if any such master or prinAppeal, whose decision in such case shall be final and cipal officer, whose duties for the time being may bave conclusive.

have relation solely or chiefly to the Chancery Division 15. Estension of Winter Assizes Act of 1876 to all as- of the said High Court, shall be appointed by the Lord sizes.] The Winter Assizes Act, 1876, shall henceforth extend Chief Justice of England, such appointment shall be made to all assizes to be held at any time of the year, and to every | with the concurrence of the Lord Cbancellor or the Master session of oyer and terminer and gaol delivery to be held of the Rolls. for the Central Criminal Court district at any time of the L 21. Extension of section 14 of the Courts of Justice year, in the same manner as if the word " winter" (Salaries and Funds) Act, 1869.) The provisions of section were omitted from the said Act, and as if the months | fourteen of tbe Courts of Justice (Salaries and Funds) Act, of November, December, or January were not mentioned 1869, shall henceforth be applicable to all officers of the therein.

Supreme Court of Judicature in the same manner and

« PreviousContinue »