Parliamentary Papers, Volume 59

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 390 - ... husbandry, and perhaps French, is generally apprenticed to some respectable merchant in whose counting-house he remains two or three years, or at least until he becomes familiar with exchanges and such other commercial matters as may best qualify him to represent his principal in foreign countries.
Page 12 - I am sorry to state that, in my opinion, the British commercial marine is at present in a worse condition than that of any other nation. Foreign shipmasters are generally a more respectable and sober class of men than the British. I have always been convinced that, while British shipowners gain by the more economical manner in which their vessels are navigated, they are great losers from the serious delays occasioned, while on the voyage, and discharging and taking in cargoes, growing out of the...
Page 1 - The removal of commercial restrictions, while it would be of mutual advantage to the material interests of both countries, could not but give openings to still further relations of amity between them, and, by its influence on ,the intercourse of nations, create new guarantees for the peace of the world.
Page 34 - there is not — and I say it with regret — a more troublesome and thoughtless set of men, to use the mildest term, to be met with than British merchant-seamen. Only very lately, a master left his vessel, which was loaded with a valuable cargo and ready for sea, and was, after several days...
Page 8 - ... commanded by good or incompetent masters ; showing, therefore, the advantage, as regards preserving the character of British seamen, of their being commanded by a class of persons who should combine with skill in their profession, a knowledge of the means of properly maintaining authority on board their ships.
Page 1 - ... it is our intention to propose to parliament, without unnecessary delay, measures which would enable us to place our commercial intercourse, in regard to the matters to which your note refers, on the most liberal and comprehensive basis, with respect to all countries •which shall be willing to act in a corresponding spirit towards us.
Page 14 - That it is expedient to remove the restrictions which prevent the free carriage of goods by sea to and from the United Kingdom and the British possessions abroad ; and to amend the laws regulating the coasting trade of the United Kingdom, subject, nevertheless, to such control by Her Majesty in Council as may be necessary ; and also to amend the laws for the registration of ships and seamen.
Page 15 - The Canadian farmer is a supplicant at present to the Imperial Legislature, not for favour, but for justice ; and, strong as is his affection for the mother country and her institutions, he cannot reconcile it to his sense of right, that, after being deprived of all protection for his produce in her markets, he should be subjected to a hostile discriminating duty in the guise of a law for the protection of navigation.
Page 8 - of gaining information in regard to instances which have come under your observation of the incompetency of British shipmasters to manage their vessels and their crews, whether arising from deficiency of knowledge of practical navigation and seamanship, or of moral character...
Page 13 - ... more respectable and sober class of men than the British. I have always been convinced that, while British shipowners gain by the more economical manner in which their vessels are navigated, they are great losers from the serious delays occasioned, while on the voyage, and discharging and taking in cargoes, growing out of the incapacity of their shipmasters, and their intemperate habits. I have had occasion to remark, while consul in the United States, that American vessels, in particular, will...

Bibliographic information