Journal of the Western Society of Engineers

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 242 - It is only within the last two or three years that the United States has given any thought whatever to the conservation of its natural resources.
Page 642 - Shortleaf Pine. It is understood that these two terms are descriptive of quality, rather than of botanical species. Thus, shortleaf pine would cover such species as are now known as North Carolina pine, loblolly pine, and shortleaf pine. "Longleaf Pine" is descriptive of quality, and if Cuban, shortleaf, or loblolly pine is grown under such conditions that it produces a large percentage of hard summer wood, so as to be equivalent to the wood produced by the true longleaf, it would be covered by the...
Page 341 - local improvement" has been defined to be a public improvement which, by reason of its being confined to a locality, enhances the value of adjacent property as distinguished from benefits diffused by it throughout the municipality.
Page 657 - Dimension Sizes— All square lumber shall show two-thirds heart on two sides, and not less than one-half heart on two other sides. Other sizes shall show two-thirds heart on faces, and show heart two-thirds of the length on edges, excepting where the width exceeds the thickness by three inches or over, then it shall show heart on the edges for one-half the length.
Page 249 - ... spring up over night — locating the storage of inflammable oils and explosives, would keep the city clean of its most persistent fire dangers. Every fireman should in turn cover every section in the course of six months. One would thus check up the inspections of the other, and local conditions would become a matter for educative conversation about headquarters. There is, however, a most important result to be achieved by such an inspection system over and beyond keeping the city clean; and...
Page 246 - The big manufacturers and the big merchants know that this fire expense is a tax. They equip their premises with automatic sprinklers. They put in protective apparatus. They get the lowest insurance rate they can because it helps them to compete ; but the man in the street, the ordinary man, does not know how this fire waste is paid. Take wool, for example. Wool in the warehouse is insured — that is a tax. It is insured in transportation, and there it pays a fire tax. It is insured in the textile...
Page 246 - America, if we take up the morning paper and do not find two or three $100.000 fires recorded we think it has been a dull evening! We are the most careless people with matches on the face of the earth. In Europe, if you want matches you have to go where they are kept. In America matches are everywhere — on our bureaus ; in our desk drawers ; on the...
Page 248 - ... shall hereafter require repair to the extent of one-third of their area shall be replaced with incombustible roofs. The modern shingle is thin, and the machinery which now makes it leaves a fuzzy surface which, after a period of drought, becomes like tinder. Without shingle roofs flying brands...
Page 247 - The fire waste touches the pocket of every man, woman and child in the nation; it strikes as surely but as quietly as indirect taxation; it merges with the cost of everything we eat and drink and wear. The profligate burning every year of $230,000,000 in the value of work of men's hands means the inevitable impoverishment of the people.
Page 250 - ... upon the man who has a fire as one who has done an unneighborly thing; as one who is a public offender unless he can prove that he was in no way responsible for that fire : then we will have begun to make headway. We must have inquiry into the causes of all fires, not merely an inquiry into the fire which is suspected to be the work of some incendiary. Nearly every fire is the result of some carelessness ; and the careless man must be held up to public criticism as a man who has picked the pockets...

Bibliographic information