Sallust, On the Gods and the World: And the Pythagoric Sentences of Demophilus, Translated from the Greek; and Five Hymns by Proclus, in the Original Greek, with a Poetical Version. To which are Added Five Hymns by the Translator

Front Cover
E. Jeffrey, 1793 - Ethics - 169 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page iii - I vol., 8vo. 1793Sallust on the Gods and the World ; and the Pythagoric Sentences of Demophilus. Translated from the Greek ; and Five Hymns, by Proclus, in the original Greek, with a poetical version. To which are added Five Hymns by the translator.
Page 16 - But we may perceive the mixed kind of fables, as well in many other particulars, as when they relate, that Discord, at a banquet of the gods, threw a golden apple, and that a dispute about it arising among the goddesses, they were sent by Jupiter to take the judgment of Paris, who, charmed with the beauty of Venus, gave her the apple in preference to the rest.
Page 101 - Divinity such things as, when obtained, you cannot preserve; for no gift of Divinity can ever be taken away; and on this account he does not confer that which you are unable to retain. 2. Be vigilant in your intellectual part; for sleep about this has an affinity with real death.
Page 16 - ... the banquet denotes the supermundane powers of the gods; and on this account they subsist in conjunction with each other: but the golden apple denotes the world, which, on account of its composition from contrary natures, is not improperly said to be thrown by Discord, or strife. But again...
Page 104 - A loquacious and ignorant man, both in prayer and facrifice, contarn'matee a divine nature : the wife man therefore is alone a prieft, is alone the friend of divinity, and only knows how to pray. ' , The wife man being fent hither naked, mould naked invoke him by whom he was fent ; for he alone is heard by divinity who is not burthened with foreign concerns. It is...
Page 114 - ... but a lover of riches is necessarily unjust ; and the unjust is necessarily profane towards divinity, and lawless with respect to men. Hence, though he should sacrifice hecatombs, he is only by this means the more impious, unholy, atheistical, and sacrilegious with respect to his intention : and on this account it is necessary...
Page 71 - Gods through similitude : but when vicious, we are separated from them through dissimilitude. And while we live according to virtue, we partake of the Gods, but when we become evil, we cause them to become our enemies ; not that they are angry, but because guile prevents us from receiving the illuminations of the Gods, and subjects us to the power of avenging demons.
Page 105 - It is better to converse more with yourself than with others. 13. If you are always careful to remember, that in whatever place either your soul or body accomplishes any deed, Divinity is present as an inspector of your conduct; in all your words and actions you will venerate the presence of an inspector from whom nothing can be concealed, and will, at the same time, possess Divinity as an intimate associate.
Page 31 - Jupiter, jEsculapius in Apollo, and the Graces in Venus. We may also behold the spheres with which they are connected, viz. Vesta with the earth, Neptune with water, Juno with air, and Vulcan with fire. But Apollo and Diana are assumed for the sun and moon ; the sphere of Saturn is attributed to Ceres ; ether to Minerva; and heaven is common to them all.
Page 29 - Jupiter, Neptune and Vulcan fabricate the world. Ceres, Juno and Diana animate it; Mercury, Venus and Apollo harmonize it ; and lastly, Vesta, Minerva and Mars preside over it with a guardian power.

Bibliographic information