The Pacific Reporter, Volume 27

Front Cover
West Publishing Company, 1892 - Law reports, digests, etc
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - To divide, withdraw, or in any manner pay to the stockholders, or any of them, any part of the capital stock of the corporation; or to reduce such capital stock without the consent of the legislature; or 3.
Page 308 - ... a question of fact for the jury, and not of law for the court.
Page 38 - The parties to a contract may agree therein upon an amount which shall be presumed to be the amount of damage sustained by a breach thereof, when, from the nature of the case, it would be impracticable or extremely difficult to fix the actual damage.
Page 231 - The legislature shall direct by law in what manner and in what courts suits may be brought against the State.
Page 403 - In every action for the recovery of real property, or the possession thereof, the person establishing a legal title to the premises shall be presumed to have been possessed thereof within the time required by law ; and the occupation of such premises by any other person, shall be deemed to have been under, and in subordination to, the legal title...
Page 251 - Witnesseth, that the said parties of the first part, for and in consideration of the sum of twenty-one hundred dollars, to them in hand paid by the said party of the second part...
Page 31 - ... if such allegation be controverted, the party pleading must establish, on the trial, the facts showing that the cause of action is so barred.
Page 86 - A valuable consideration, in the sense of the law, may consist either in some right, interest, profit, or benefit accruing to the one party, or some forbearance, detriment, loss or responsibility given, suffered, or undertaken by the other.
Page 354 - The following acts or omissions in respect to a court of justice, or proceedings therein, are contempts of the authority of the court: 1. Disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent behavior toward the judge while holding the court, tending to interrupt the due course of a trial or other judicial proceeding; 2.
Page 44 - ... their dissent therefrom to be entered at large on the minutes of the directors at the time, or were not present when the same did happen) are, in their individual...

Bibliographic information