FOUR YEARS CAMPAIGNING IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 155 - Except now and then a stray picket Is shot, as he walks on his beat to and fro, By a rifleman hid in the thicket. 'Tis nothing — a private or two now and then Will not count in the news of the battle; Not an officer lost — only one of the men, Moaning out, all alone, the death-rattle." All quiet along the Potomac...
Page 155 - Far away in the cot on the mountain. His musket falls slack, — his face, dark and grim, Grows gentle with memories tender, As he mutters a prayer for...
Page 70 - An order of the President devolves upon Maj.-Gen. Burnside the command of this army. In parting from you I cannot express the love and gratitude I bear to you. As an army you have grown up under my care. In you I have never found doubt or coldness. The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation's history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease...
Page 70 - The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation's history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease, the broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled — the strongest associations which can exist among men — unite us still by an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our country and the nationality of its people.
Page 155 - There's only the sound of the lone sentry's tread As he tramps from the rock to the fountain, And he thinks of the two in the low trundlebed Far away in the cot on the mountain. His musket falls slack ; his face, dark and grim, Grows gentle with memories tender As he mutters a prayer for the children asleep, For their mother : may Heaven defend her!
Page 70 - The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease, the broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled,—the strongest associations which can exist among men,—unite us still by an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our country and the nationality of its people.
Page 207 - You will also possess the rich inheritance of meriting the continued plaudits, and enjoying the constant gratitude of a free people, whose greatness you have preserved in its hour of most imminent peril. In the name of the people of Michigan, I thank you for the honor you have done us by your valor, your soldierly bearing, your invincible courage everywhere displayed, whether upon the field of battle, in the perilous assault, or in the deadly breach ; for your patience under the fatigues and privations...
Page 132 - Now what is the reason that we cannot walk right straight through them with our far superior numbers ? We fight as good as they. They must understand the country better, or else there is a screw loose somewhere in the machinery of our army.
Page 15 - If a man in my regiment is hurt, the streets of Baltimore will run with blood." The order forward is given, our band strike up the tune of Dixie, and one thousand and forty men keep step to the music. The mob on the streets could tell by •the steady tread of the soldiers and the watchfulness of their eyes that it would be useless to try the Sixth Massachusetts game on us. Arrived safe at the depot, we take the cars for Washington, where we arrive after a forty miles ride.
Page 88 - Taneytown, whose people show their loyality by waving their handkerchiefs and showering flowers on our path. This village is called after the learned Judge Taney, Chief-Justice of the United States. The roads around here are beautiful and macadamized, and we enjoy marching over them very much. Every man in the ranks feel jubilant; we keep step to some song that is sung by the soldiers, crack our jokes, and all feel happy. We pass some nice villages, and at every place we are met with perfect ovations....

Bibliographic information