Page images
PDF
EPUB

Covers

an

ex

an

avenue

room

are

dairy products but also a Dairy tion. It measures 1687 by 787 School, in connection with which feet, and covers nearly 31 acres, will be conducted a series of tests being the largest Exposition for determining the relative merits building ever constructed. Withof different breeds of dairy cattle in the building a gallery 50 feet as milk and butter producers. wide extends around all four

The building stands near the sides, and projecting from this lake shore in the southeastern are 86 smaller galleries, 12 feet part of the park, and close by the wide, from which visitors may general live stock exhibit. It survey the vast array of exhibits

approximately half and the busy scene below. The acre, measuring 95x200 feet, is galleries are approached upon the two stories high and cost $30,000. main floor by 30 great staircases, In design it is of quiet exterior. the flights of which are 12 feet On the first floor, beside office wide each. "Columbia Avenue," headquarters, there is in front a 50 feet wide, extends through the large open space devoted to mammoth building longitudinally, hibits of butter, and farther back and

of like width an operating room 25x100 feet, in crosses it at right angles at the which the Model Dairy will be center. The main roof is of iron conducted. On two sides of this and glass, and arches an area 385

amphitheatre seats, by 1400 feet, and has its ridge 150 capable of accommodating 400 feet from the ground. The buildspectators. Under these seats ing, including its galleries, has are refrigerators and cold storage about 40 acres of floor space. rooms for the care of the dairy The Manufactures and Liberal products. The operating-room, Arts Building is in the Corinwhich extends to the roof, has on thian style of architecture, and in three sides a gallery where the point of being severely classic excheese exhibits will be placed. cels nearly all of the other edifices. The rest of the second story is The long array of columns and devoted to a cafe, which opens

arches, which its facades present, a balcony overlooking the is relieved from monotony by very lake.

elaborate ornamentation. In this The Dairy School, it is believed, ornamentation female figures, will be most instructive and valu- symbolical of the various arts and able to agriculturists.

sciences, play a conspicuous and

very attractive part. THE MANUFACTURES AND LIBERAL

The exterior of the building is ARTS BUILDING.

covered with "staff," which is NOTABLE for its symmetrical treated to represent marble. The proportions, the Manufactures huge fluted columns and the and Liberal Arts Building is the

immense arches are apparently of mammoth structure of the Exposi

this beautiful material.

on

[blocks in formation]

are

archway of each being 40 feet wide and 80 feet high. Surmounting these portals is the great attic story ornamented with sculptured eagles 18 feet high, and on each side above the side arches are great panels with inscriptions, and the spandrils are filled with sculptured figures in bas-relief. At each corner of the main building are pavilions forming great arched entrances,

which designed in harmony with the great portals.

The building occupies a most conspicuous place in the grounds. It faces the lake, with only lawns and promenades between. North of it is the United States Government building, south the Harbor and in-jutting lagoon, and west the Electrical Building and the lagoon separating it from the great island, which in part is wooded and in part resplendent with acres

of bright flowers of varied hues.

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

There are four great entrances, one in the center of each facade. These are designed in the manner of triumphal arches, the central

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed]

The glass fronts for the Marine

was

15 feet wide. The glass fronts for the Marine Aquaria is conof the Aquaria are in length structed of vulcanite. The pumps about 575 feet, and have 3000 are in duplicate, and each has a square feet of surface.

capacity of 3,000 gallons per hour. The total water capacity of the The supply of sea water Aquaria, exclusive of reservoirs, secured by evaporating the necesis 18,725 cubic feet, or 140,000 sary quantity at the Wood's Holl gallons. This weighs 1,192,425 station of the United States Fish pounds, or almost 600 tons. Of Commission to about one-fifth its this amount about 40,000 gallons bulk, thus reducing both quantity is devoted to the Marine exhibit. and weight for transportation In the entire salt water circula- about 80 per cent. The fresh tion, including reservoirs, there water required to restore it to its

about 80,000 gallons. The proper density was supplied from pumping and distributing plant Lake Michigan.

are

LITERARY DEPARTMENT.

Yet, we will not speak of age

In a sad and mournful strain,
For winter does not come

To bring us tears and pain.

WORDS OF WELCOME.
Welcome all ye aged veterans !

For the day to you belongs,
Hear the happy strains of music,

Listen to the joyful songs.
Noble fathers honored mothers,

For your happiness we pray ;
Eagerly we strive to serve you,

Make your spirits light and gay.
These, your fair and noble daughters,

Guided by the Lord on high,
Long have labored much have gathered,

That the aged might have joy.
We love to see the dear old eyes

With pleasure brightly shine,
Your faces filled with radiance,

The light of love divine.
We cannot ask that flowers

Always bloom beneath your feet,
For we know the awful poison,

And the sting of things too sweet.
We only ask that Father

Will lead us all aright,
And guide the weary, trembling feet,

Through darkness into light.

There the eyes now dim shall brighten,

And the weary ones be free,
And the light of love will waken

Songs of peace and unity.
There the feast will be eternal,

Loved ones meet to part no more ;
No hot tears nor aching bosoms

On that bright and happy shore.
There all hearts will be united,

There the weary be at rest,
And with Christ will dwell forever

In the mansions of the blest,
Written and read by Mrs. Sarah Rust, at the
Old Folks dinner, which was given them by the
Y. L. M. I. A. Richfield, Dec. 28th, 1892.

THORBORG. On the sunny side of F--Street, in Frederiksborg, stood a tall, grey stone building, taller by one two stories than its neighbors, which of course made

Time has gathered all the roses

From your faces long ago;
Their precious bloom and odor

Has beeu washed by winter's snow;

or

over

a

it quite conspicuous, and in its them in the moonlight glide third story dwelt the right softly over the sea far away in honorable Mr. Landsho, royal the distance, and melt away in government officer, post-master of the foam like those in Andersen's Frederiksborg.

tale. And when the strange fan The postmaster was the proud cies of tender girlhood had first and happy father of seven chil- begun to stir her young soul she dren, five of which had already had seen the plumed knight in started life for themselves, with his lonely boat and heard the husbands and wives after their melancholy strains float over the own hearts. Two remained, Emil waves as his white fingers played and Thorborg. Emil was a clerk with the guitar strings. And how in the post-office, and Thorborg wistfully she had looked was her father's pet and her toward Frederiksborg palace as it mother's right hand.

She was

lay a grand and gloomy pile in pretty girl, rather of the buxom the moonlight, wishing she had sort, with glowing cheeks and a lived in the days when laughter saucy mouth and deep grey eyes. and gayety had sounded from

On one particular morning in within, and that she had been lovely June Thorborg had taken one of the courted ladies, whose her crotchet-basket, after the knight pined away in hopeless room had been put in order after love of her. Now that she had breakfast, which was taken at ten outgrown most of these fancies, o'clock, being the second meal of she still sat dreaming in the the day, and had gone down to en greenhouse of an evening wonderjoy an hour's fresh air in he back ing what shape her knight would garden, which, narrow as it was, ultimately assume; whether that ran out in a point in the Slots of a very ordinary young man, sea, a beautiful strip of lake, all in swallow-tail coat, red hair, wreathed in with mournfully ditto moustache and great big drooping willows and sturdy old clumsy hands, or that of a slender oaks. Out the very point young man, in priestly garb, who stood the most inviting little drawled out the prayers in such greenhouse you could imagine, a beautiful, pious fashion each and this was young Thorborg's Sunday in the Slots church, both favorite nook. There she had of whom she knew secretly sighed dreamed away many a

summer for her. evening, while listening to the But this morning she had not soft murmuring of the wavelets

to dream,

but merely as they gently rolled landwards, snatched away

few short sometimes playfully leaping right moments from her practical busy up into the greenhouse.

day-work to finish a bit of fine When a child she had heard network, intended for

her the mermaid's songs, as she saw mother's birthday. As she was

on

come

a

« PreviousContinue »