Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

ROBERT N. STANFIELD, Oregon, Chairman REED SMOOT, Utah.

KEY PITTMAN, Nevada. PETER NORBECK, South Dakota.

ANDRIEUS A, JONES, New Mexico. RALPH CAMERON, Arizona.

JOHN B. KENDRICK, Wyoming. TASKER L, ODDIE, Nevada.

THOMAS J. WALSH, Montana.
PORTER H. DALE, Vermont.

HENRY F. ASHURST, Arizona.
C. C. DILL, Washington.

R. J. DOOLEY, Clerk

SUBCOMMITTEE ON S. RES. 347

ROBERT N. STANFIELD, Oregon, Chairman RALPH CAMERON, Arizona.

ANDRIEUS A. JONES, New Mexico. TASKER L. ODDIE, Nevada.

JOHN B. KENDRICK, Wyoming. PORTER H. DALE, Vermont.

C. C. DILL, Washington.
HENRY F. ASHURST, Arizona.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

WYOMING HEARINGS

Rock SPRINGS, WYO., SEPTEMBER 30, 1925

Page

J. D. Noblitt, cattle and sheep man, Cokeville, W'yo., representing the

Lincoln County Wool Growers' Association ----

3051

Statement of Lincoln County Wool Growers' Association.

3052

Attitude on platform adopted by stockmen at Salt Lake City, Utah,

August 25 and 26, 1925_-

3059

Attitude on 640-acre stock-raising homestead law-

3060

Attitude on proposed enlargement of Yellowstone National Park.. 3066

P. W. Jenkins, cattleman, Cora, Wyo-----

3069

Resolutions adopted by the Big Piney and Green River Roundup

Associations

3070

Oscar Beck, cattleman, Big Piney, Wyo---

3079, 3148

T. D. O'Neil, cattleman, Big Piney, Wyo----

3086, 3149, 3153

James P. Jensen, cattleman, Big Piney, Wyo---

3092

Dennis J. Sheehan, cattleman, Promontory Point, Utah.

3099

Charles A. Myers, cattleman, Knight, Wyo-----

3104

Frank Yates, lawyer, Rock Springs, Wyo--

3109

T. S. Taliaferro, jr., cattle and sheep man, Rock Springs, Wyo---

3117

Resolutions as reported unanimously by the committee on resolutions

and adopted by the public lands convention, at Denver, Colo.,

June 18, 19, and 20, 1907---

3118

J. W. Hay, stockman, Rock Springs, Wyo---

3129

Joseph Fields, cattleman, Lima, Wyo----

3134

Ernest Winkler, assistant district forester in charge of grazing, district

No. 4, Uuited States Forest Service, Ogden, Utah.

3136, 3154

C. E. Favre, forest supervisor, Wyoming National Forest, United States

Forest Service, Kemmerer, Wyo-----

3151

Statement of C. E. Favre, replying to testimony given at Rock

Springs, Wyo-----

3156

CASPER, Wyo., OCTOBER 2, 1925

[graphic]

I

Page B. J. Erwin, former register, United States Land Office, Douglas, Wyo.,

opposed to the repeal of the 640-acre stock raising homestead law. 3202 Kleber H. Hadsell, sheepman, Rawlins, Wyo---

3204 P. H. Shallenberger, cattle and sheep man, Lost Cabin, Wyo--

3206 E. W. Burritt, civil engineer, Casper, Wyo., regarding stock driveways provided for in the stock raising homestead la..

3214 L. E. Vivion, sheepman, Rawlins, Wyo---

3215 A. M. Teakell, abstracting and accounting, Douglas, Wyo., protesting

against the removal of the land office from Douglas to Cheyenne, Wyo 3218 John K. Hartt, sheepman, Rawlins, Wyo.--

3221 Lee Simonsen, sheepman, Thermopolis, Wyo---

3224 A. L. Pearson, president, Big Horn Wool Growers' Association, Cody, Wyo--

3228 M. J. Gothberg, sheepman, Casper, Wyo--

3231 Timothy Mahoney, sheepman, Casper, Wyo---

3232 George A. Bible, banker and sheepman, Rawlins, Wyo---

3234 C. H. McWhinnie, commissioner of public lands, State of Wyoming, Casper, Wyo.

3239 Hon. B. B. Brooks, banker, stockman, and oil operator, former Governor

of Wyoming. Casper, W'yo., regarding reduction of oil royalties in the Salt Creek field

3239 E. H. Shideler, president, Hobac Livestock Association, presenting reso

lution urging increase in congressional appropriations for the eradication of rodent pests.

3242 H. L. Budd, president, Big Piney Roundup Association, presenting reso

lution urging increase in congressional appropriations for the eradi. cation of rodent pests.--

3242 M. L. Bishop, lawyer, representing Natrona County Wool Growers' Association, Casper, Wyo., regarding stock driveways.

3242
Charles B. Stafford, secretary-manager, Casper Chamber of Commerce,
Casper, Wyo., presenting-
Statement of facts, argument, and brief prepared by the Chamber

of Commerce of Casper, Wyo., “ The Casper-Alcova irrigation
project "-

3244 Introduction

3244 The North Platte River..

3243 The Pathfinder Dam---

3245 Annual volume of water

3245 History of the project.

3245 The feasibility of the project--it was intended to irrigate the lands in the Casper-Alcova project.

3247 Application for permit by Federal Government covered our lands. 3247 This project is an unfinished project-

3249 The Pathfinder dam a detriment to the Casper-Alcova project-- 3249 We have supported the Pathfinder project-

3250 Most of the water impounded goes to Nebraska.

3250 There is sufficient surplus water stored for our project.

3250 Casper-Alcova project comprises 88,000 acres.

3250 Wealth produced from the Salt Creek oil fields...

3250 Most of the wealth of the Salt Creek field is lost to us..

3251 Original policy of the Federal Government was to return to the States the proceeds of public lands_

3251 First big well in Salt Creek oil field.--

3251 Assessed valuations, increased population.

3251 Agriculture and stock raising show no increase

3251 Oil industry has caused enormous expenditures.

3251 Enumeration of equities in Casper-Alcova project--

3251 Conclusion

3252 Memoranduin leading up to Wyoming claim for equitable considera

tion in the matter of the Casper-Alcova irrigation project, prepared
by Hon. Charles E. Winter and Hon. Philip E. Winter, lawyers,
Casper, Wyo.----

3254 Frank C. Emerson, State engineer of Wyoming, Cheyenne, Wyo., regarding the Casper-Alcova irrigation project.

3264 The economic test..

3264 The equities involved.

3266 The general benefits that would accrue to the entire community---- 3268

NATIONAL FORESTS AND THE PUBLIC DOMAIN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1925

UNITED STATES SENATE,
SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE
ON PUBLIC LANDS AND SURVEYS,

Rock Springs, Wyo. The subcommittee met, pursuant to adjournment, on yesterday, at 9 o'clock a. m., Wednesday, September 30, 1925, in the Elks' Club, Rock Springs, Wyo., Senator Robert N. Stanfield (chairman) presiding.

The CHAIRMAN. The meeting will come to order.

Gentlemen, this is a meeting of a subcommittee of the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys of the United States Senate, holding hearings under a resolution passed at the last session of the Senate. That resolution provides :

Resolved, That the Committee on Public Lands and Surveys, or any duly authorized subcommittee thereof, is authorized to investigate all matters relating to national forests and to the public domain and their administration, including grazing lands, forest reserves, and other reservations and lands withdrawn from entry. For the purpose of this resolution such committee or subcommittee is authorized to hold hearings and to sit and act at such places and times; to employ such experts and clerical, stenographic, and other assistants; to require by subpæna or otherwise the attendance of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents; to administer such oaths and to take such testimony and make such expenditures as it deems advisable.

We are not holding these hearings to listen to testimony on any one particular question, but on any question that may arise pertaining to the public domain, reserved or unreserved. "Included in the reserved areas are forest reserves, Indian reservations, mineral reservations, national parks, national monuments, game preserves, and any other areas that have been withdrawn or reserved from the public domain. We will be pleased to listen to such witnesses as want to be heard to-day, and will listen to them on any question that in anywise pertains to the public lands.

I have here a list of witnesses who have indicated a desire to be heard, and I will call first on Mr. Noblitt.

STATEMENT OF J. D. NOBLITT, SHEEP AND CATTLE RAISER,

COKEVILLE, WYO.

The CHAIRMAN. Mr. Noblitt, are you engaged in the livestock business?

Mr. NOBLITT. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. In what branch of the livestock industry?
Mr. NOBLITT. Sheep and cattle.

The CHAIRMAN. Do you graze within the confines of the national forest?

Mr. NOBLITT. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Are you grazing upon the public domain?
Mr. NOBLITT. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. How long have you been engaged in the livestock business?

Mr. NOBLITT. About a quarter of a century.
The CHAIRMAX. On what national forest do you graze?
Mr. NOBLITT. The Wyoming and Teton National Forests.

The CHAIRMAN. Have you a statement that you will make to the committee in your own way, Mr. Noblitt?

Mr. NOBLITT. I have a statement representing the sentiment of an organization known as the Lincoln County Wool Growers' Association. I was requested by the organization to present it.

The CHAIRMAN. Very well. We will be pleased to listen to it.

Mr. NOBLITT. I will state that this statement of sentiment represents, as I understand it, what the people of this organization, consisting of some 200 members, most of them users of the national forests, have favored as far back as I have known anything about the national forests or this public land grazing question.

We have had many meetings where this subject in part was the reason for the meeting, going back many years. They attempted a few evenings ago to bring this statement into a brief form as nearly as they could, attempting to convey to you the sentiment as far back as the question has been before them and as nearly up to date as possible. It is addressed to your committee, Senator Stanfield, and it reads:

The early settlers of all the now thickly populated States of the East enjoyed practically unlimited use of the public domain. They were restricted only by the Indians and predatory animals. The Federal Government did not then have the temerity to ask them to pay for letting their hogs and goats and other livestock feed and range upon the unoccupied Government land.

The settlers of that day could not have progressed and built up the country without the use of those large areas of public lands.

The progress and success of the early pioneer encouraged other settlers to follow.

The soil was fertile and the climate was generally favorable.

Then came the mines, the mills, the factories, the railroads, and the cities, with the industrial centers, with their thousands upon thousands of employees at good wages, furnishing favorable and convenient markets for the meats, grains, and all other products of the farm.

In a very large degree and within a comparatively short time those lands became too valuable to be used for pasture. Intensive farming was justified in order to supply the ever-increasing local demands for food.

Homes, churches, schools, and roads were built. The population continued to increase. Practically every acre of tillable land passed into private ownership; and still more settlers came, came and bought those lands from the earlier settlers at prices that were profitable to the pioneers. And why? Why did they buy those improved lands instead of coming on further West to where they could secure homesteads for a filing fee? Because the early settler, the pioneer, had “blazed the trail," had built the schools and highways that brought the railroads and the factories that made it a fit country in which a man could live and raise and educate his family.

« PreviousContinue »