The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States: With an Appendix, Containing Important State Papers and Public Documents, and All the Laws of a Public Nature; with a Copious Index ... [First To] Eighteenth Congress.--first Session: Comprising the Period from [March 3, 1789] to May 27, 1824, Inclusive. Comp. from Authentic Materials, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1781 - President makes public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government, being males of the age of fourteen years and upwards, who shall be within the United States, and not actually naturalized, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, secured, and removed, as alien enemies.
Page 1949 - The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.
Page 1317 - SEC 2. And be it further enacted, That the accounting officers of the Treasury be, and they are hereby, authorized and directed...
Page 1781 - States may ascertain and declare such reasonable time as may be consistent with the public safety, and according to the dictates of humanity and national hospitality.
Page 1771 - An act to establish an uniform rule of naturalization; and to repeal the act heretofore passed on that subject...
Page 1243 - March, 1822, that the American provinces of Spain which have declared their independence, and are in the enjoyment of it, ought to be recognized bit the United States as independent nations.
Page 1773 - Dartmouth college were the same in the new that they had been in the old government. The power of the government was also the same. A repeal of this charter at any time prior to the adoption of the present constitution of the United States would have been an extraordinary and unprecedented act of power...
Page 1703 - That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people; that magistrates are their trustees and servants, and at all times amenable to them.
Page 1627 - in the event of a declaration of war against the United States, or of actual invasion of their territory by a foreign power, or of imminent danger of such invasion discovered in his opinion to exist, before the next session of Congress...
Page 1781 - President is authorized, in any such event, by his proclamation thereof, or other public act, to direct the conduct to be observed, on the part of the United States, toward the aliens who become so liable ; the manner and degree of the restraint to which they shall be subject and in what cases, and upon what security their residence shall be permitted...

Bibliographic information