Journal of the Outdoor Life, Volume 17

Front Cover
Journal of the Outdoor Life Publishing Company, 1920 - Open-air treatment
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 32 - DRAMA, and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act...
Page 75 - Against the earth's sweet flowing breast; A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray...
Page 53 - All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent for a period of three months; the physical signs to be those of a healed lesion.
Page 32 - Managers none. 2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of individual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of the total amount of stock.) The National Historical Society. No stockholders. 3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders...
Page 89 - Association and the Vigilance Committee of the Associated Advertising Clubs of the World, and is meeting with success in its endeavors.
Page 35 - Baltimore, the initial meeting for the purpose of considering a national tuberculosis association was called. Two months later at another meeting held in Philadelphia, it was definitely decided upon by the group present, consisting of many of the leading physicians of America, that a national association should be formed, and in June of 1904 on the occasion of the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis became a reality...
Page 42 - When it was believed that opportunity for infection played the decisive role in tuberculosis morbidity, it was believed that relatively much tuberculosis developed in the tenements because the condensation of population and its consequent evils established quantitatively an unusual degree of contact with the germ. But, as it became more and more apparent that many adult breakdowns occurred on the basis of long-standing infection, newer explanations were demanded. These explanations are not far to...
Page 95 - ... monthly and the result of exposure to such dangers is not evident as it would be if the workers remained at the same work for longer periods. As a result of the survey industrial hygiene engineers devised means of removing the dust from the air and minimizing hazards from fumes and poisonous gases. In spite of the fact that the installation of such devices was expensive, factory managements immediately put them into use.
Page 95 - Over 200,000,000 tiny particles of dust, as sharp as ground glass, are breathed into the lungs and air passages with every cubic foot of air in some of the factories in the United States, according to a survey made by the Public Health Service here.
Page 45 - In the city of 100,000, with 100 deaths a year, this would mean a saving of 33 lives a year, which represents, when measured in money terms alone, thousands and thousands of dollars. The same methods, if successfully applied throughout our country, will mean a saving of over 50,000 lives a year — about as many as were lost by this country in the great war. That is the Framingham story in a nutshell. Of course, it is not yet complete, and the future may alter these tentative conclusions. However,...

Bibliographic information