House Documents, Otherwise Publ. as Executive Documents: 13th Congress, 2d Session-49th Congress, 1st Session, Volume 21

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xlviii - ... that the moneys so invested shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished (except so far as may be provided in section fifth of this act), and the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by each State which may take and claim the benefit of this act...
Page 318 - State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the...
Page 319 - College;" the design of the institution, in fulfillment of the injunction of the constitution, is to afford thorough instruction in agriculture, and the natural sciences connected therewith; to effect that object most completely, the institution shall combine physical with intellectual education, and shall be a high seminary of learning, in which the graduate of the common school can commence, pursue and finish a course of study, terminating in thorough theoretic and practical instruction in those...
Page 318 - When lands shall be selected from those which have been raised to double the minimum price, in consequence of railroad grants, they shall be computed to the States at the maximum price, and the number of acres proportionally diminished. Sixth. No State while in a condition of rebellion or insurrection against the Government of the United States shall be entitled to the benefit of this act.
Page 318 - And provided, further, That not more than one million acres shall be located by such assignees in any one of the States: And provided, further, That no such location shall be made before one year from the passage of this act.
Page 166 - It is a common practice to go through the vines with a plough every fall and throw up a good ridge of earth against the stalks. The Hungarians have a more effectual way of guaranteeing against the cold of their rigorous winters, which is to lay the vines on the ground, cover them with straw, and on the straw throw the earth; without this, it is said, they could produce no wine at all. Our native grapes are generally hardy, and will live wherever their fruit will ripen; but occasionally there is a...
Page 318 - ... the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated, by each State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts...
Page 321 - State, the declared object of which convention was, to take into consideration such means as might be deemed most expedient to further the interests of the agricultural community, and particularly to take steps towards the establishment of an Agricultural University.
Page 197 - COO years carried a volume of water equal to 1,800 cubic feet per second. This great mass of water has been spread over the surface of the country through a thousand channels, stimulating the productiveness of the soil to such an extent as to make the country through which it passes one of the richest and most densely populated which the world has ever seen.
Page 165 - Cote d'or is what it signifies, " a hillside of gold." At its basŤ spreads out a wide and very fertile plain, covered with luxuriant vines, whose juice sells at from ten to twenty cents per gallon. If you go further northward and examine the hills of Champagne, you will find them to be merely hills of chalk; and these instances only illustrate the rule derived not from them alone, but from abundance of others, that, for good wine, you must go to a dry and meagre soil. Yet we should be sorry to have...

Bibliographic information