The Pacific Reporter, Volume 74

Front Cover
West Publishing Company, 1904 - Law reports, digests, etc
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 190 - Newly discovered evidence, material for the party making the application, which he could not, with reasonable diligence, have discovered and produced at the trial; 5.
Page 440 - Excessive damages, appearing to have been given under the influence of passion or prejudice; 6.
Page 108 - No right is held more sacred, or is more carefully guarded, by the common law, than the right of every individual to the possession and control of his own person, free from all restraint or interference of others, unless by clear and unquestionable authority of law.
Page 32 - Every act shall embrace but one subject and matters properly connected therewith; which subject shall be expressed in the title. But if any subject shall be embraced in an act, which shall not be expressed in the title, such act shall be void only as to so much thereof as shall not be expressed in the title.
Page 101 - The General Assembly shall not pass local or special laws in any of the following enumerated cases...
Page 294 - If a guardian, tenant for life or years, joint tenant, or tenant in common of real property, commit waste thereon, any person aggrieved by the waste may bring an action against him therefor, in which action there may be judgment for treble damages.
Page 27 - Where all the parties who unite in a promise receive some benefit from the consideration, whether past or present, their promise is presumed to be joint and several.
Page 306 - ... made a transfer of any of his property, and the effect of the enforcement of such judgment or transfer will be to enable any one of his creditors to obtain a greater percentage of his debt than any other of such creditors of the same class.
Page 344 - ... 1. There must have been a false representation or a concealment of material facts ; 2. The representation must have been made with knowledge of the facts; 3. The party to whom it was made must have been ignorant of the truth of the matter; 4. It must have been made with the intention that the other party should act upon it; 5. The other party must have been induced to act upon it": Bigelow on Estoppel, 3d ed., 484.
Page 233 - OATS [a grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people], — Croker.

Bibliographic information