American Indian Politics and the American Political System

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Political Science - 375 pages
As the original peoples of North America, tribal nations stand in a distinctive historical, political, and legal position in relation to state and national government. American Indian Politics is the first comprehensive study to analyze the structures and functions of American Indian governments (including Alaska Native communities) and the unique legal and political rights these nations exercise internally. David E. Wilkins expertly situates the 562 federally-recognized Native nations (and non-recognized groups) in historical context, while paying heed to the unique territorial and cultural rights that make this such a volatile field of study. Wilkins demonstrates that American Indian politics is a mixture of tribal government interacting with other polities, multiple layers of citizenship, indigenous activism and interest group activity, economic development, and media. New To This Edition The second edition incorporates fresh census data, thorough discussion of the critical electoral changes in the 2000 and 2004 national elections, and contemporary data on President Bush's first and second terms. The new edition also explores the effects of recent changes in U.S. Senate and House personnel and state legislation on Indian rights and the state-tribal relationship.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VIII
1
IX
15
X
45
XI
67
XII
109
XIII
125
XIV
129
XV
135
XXIV
255
XXV
269
XXVI
283
XXVII
287
XXVIII
291
XXIX
297
XXX
305
XXXI
309

XVI
147
XVIII
148
XIX
163
XX
176
XXI
193
XXII
211
XXIII
235
XXXII
313
XXXIII
317
XXXIV
345
XXXV
351
XXXVI
355
XXXVII
357
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

David E. Wilkins is professor of American Indian studies and adjunct professor of political science, law and American studies at the University of Minnesota.

Bibliographic information