The Military Life of Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington, K.G. &c ...

Front Cover
Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 54 - I will order my battalions to be in readiness. " Upon looking at the tope as I came in just now, it appeared to me that when you get possession of the bank of the nullah you have the tope as a matter of course, as the latter is in the rear of the former. However, you are the best judge, and I shall be ready. " I am, my dear Sir, " Your most faithful servant, "ARTHUR WELLESLEY.
Page 212 - I would sacrifice Gwalior, or every frontier of India, ten times over, in order to preserve our credit for scrupulous good faith, and the advantages and honor we gained by the late war and the peace; and we must not fritter them away in arguments, drawn from overstrained principles of the laws of nations, which are not understood in this country. What brought me through many difficulties in the war, and the negotiations for peace? The British good...
Page 212 - India, ten times over, in order to preserve our credit for scrupulous good faith, and the advantages and honor we gained by the late war and the peace; and we must not fritter them away in arguments, drawn from overstrained principles of the laws of nations, which are not understood in this country. What brought me through many difficulties in the war, and the negotiations for peace? The British good faith, and nothing else.
Page 382 - All the places and forts in the kingdom of Portugal, occupied by the French troops, shall be delivered up to the British army in the state in which they are at the period of the signature of the present Convention.
Page 217 - At all events both parties appear to have been afraid of Holkar, and both to have fled from him in different directions. ' I do not think that the Commander in Chief and I have carried on the war so well by our deputies as we did ourselves.
Page 216 - God, who has brought you back in safety ; and we present ourselves in person to express our joy. " As your labours have been crowned with victory, so may your repose be graced with honours! May you long continue personally to dispense to us that full stream of security and happiness which we first received with wonder, and continue to enjoy with gratitude ; and when greater affairs shall call you from us, may the God of all castes and all nations deign to hear with favour our humble and constant...
Page 318 - I shall be obliged to leave Spencer's guns behind for want of means of moving them ; and I should have been obliged to leave my own, if it were not for the horses of the Irish commissariat. Let nobody ever prevail upon you to send a corps to any part of Europe, without horses to draw their guns.
Page 112 - I think it very probable that I shall soon hear of your being recalled ; however, considering that circumstance, and the bad state of my body, and the remedy which I am obliged to use, I should be mad if I were to think of going at this moment. " As I am writing upon this subject, I will freely acknowledge that my regret at being prevented from accompanying you has been greatly increased by the kind, candid, and handsome manner in which you have behaved towards me ; and I will confess as freely,...
Page 111 - My former letters will have shown you how much this will annoy me ; but I have never had much value for the public spirit of any man who does not sacrifice his private views and convenience, when it is necessary.
Page 383 - The cavalry are to embark their horses, as also the Generals and other Officers of all ranks. It is however fully understood that the means of conveyance for horses at the disposal of the British...

Bibliographic information