Travels in America Performed in 1806: For the Purpose of Exploring the Rivers Alleghany, Monongahela, Ohio, and Mississippi, and Ascertaining the Produce and Condition of Their Banks and Vicinity, Volume 3

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 99 - Ohio, since the cession to Congress, are no longer within our limits. Yet having been so heretofore, and still opening to us channels of extensive communication with the western and north-western country, they shall be noted in their order. The Missouri is, in fact, the principal river, contributing more to the common stream than does the Mississippi, even after its junction with the Illinois.
Page 183 - ... feet high and four or five feet in diameter at their bases; they are constructed with mud, grass and herbage: at first they lay a floor of this kind of tempered mortar on the ground, upon which they deposit a layer of eggs, and upon this a stratum of mortar seven or eight inches in thickness, and...
Page 86 - The children always take the name of the mother. On asking Adario the reason, he replied, that as the child received its substance from the mother, it was but reasonable it should transmit her name to posterity, and be a recompense for attentions and trouble.
Page 269 - A kind of jacket made of velvet, fitted tight to the shape, and laced or buttoned in front, with long points hanging down quite round the petticoat, and trimmed at the...
Page 303 - Planters are large bodies of trees firmly fixed by their roots in the bottom of the river, in a perpendicular manner, and appearing no more than about a foot above the surface of the water in its middling state. So firmly are they rooted, that the largest boat running against them, will not move them, but they frequently injure the boat.
Page 237 - Chapitoulas above, and a little more than a third of a mile in breadth, from the river to the rampart; but it has an extensive suburb on the upper side. The houses in front of the town, and for a square or two backwards, are mostly of brick, covered with slate or tile, and many of two stories. The...
Page 165 - Spaniards, who violate the night, and do evil which they dare not commit in the presence of your beams. Good Spirit ! make known to us your pleasure, by sending to us the Spirit of Dreams. Let the Spirit of Dreams proclaim your will in the night, and we will perform it through the day ; and if it say the time of some be closed, send them, Master of Life...
Page 17 - This naturally led to an inquiry, and large rewards were offered for the discovery of the perpetrators of such unparalleled crimes. It soon came out that Wilson, with an organized party of forty-five men, was the cause of such waste of blood and treasure ; that he had a station at Hurricane Island to arrest every boat that passed by the mouth of the cavern, and that he had agents at Natchez and...
Page 225 - In speaking of the quantity of water in the passes, it must be understood of what is on the bar of each pass, for immediately after passing the bar, which is very narrow, there are from five to seven fathoms at all seasons.
Page 11 - River,i which empties into the SW part of Lake Erie. The communication between Detroit and the Illinois and Indiana country, is up Miami River to Miami village; thence, by land, nine miles through a level country to the Wabash, and through the various branches of the Wabash to the respective places of distinction. A silver mine has been discovered about twenty-eight miles above Ouiatonan, and salt-springs, lime, free-stone, blue, yellow and white clay, are found in abundance on this river's banks.

Bibliographic information