Page images
PDF
EPUB

Another noteworthy feature is the unique method of working devised by the founders of the organization. The plan of appointing standing or practically permanent committees to study and report from year to year on various phases of subjects assigned has been one of the principal factors contributing to the achievements of the Association.

At the preliminary organization meeting held at Buffalo on March 30, 1899, Mr. Wallace was unanimously elected as the first President of the new Association, continuing in that capacity for two years—perhaps the most critical in its history. The new officers of the Association at that time were confronted with the necessity of "selling the proposition” to the railway world. Mr. Wallace's wide acquaintance, his high standing as an engineer and operating officer, proved of inestimable value to the Association at this period. From the beginning, the Association had the hearty approval and encouragement of the managements of railways, and has fully justified the confidence placed in it.

Mr. Wallace was an ideal presiding officer at meetings of the Association. From his wide experience, he drew freely for illustration of points under consideration. He had the happy faculty of making the discussions instructive as well as interesting, and he contributed markedly to the success of the deliberations.

Mr. Wallace's last appearance before the Association was at the annual dinner on March seventeenth of this year–1921. In his address, he reviewed briefly the steps leading up to the formation of the Association; explained for the benefit of the younger members some of the motives actuating the founders in building the frame-work or foundation of the substantial structure which has been reared in subsequent years, and gave some interesting reminiscences of the early years of the organization's existence.

The American Railway Engineering Association owes a great measure of its remarkable success to the genius of John Findley Wallace.

Mr. Wallace was married at Rock Island, Illinois, on September 11, 1871, to Miss Sarah E. Ulmer, who survives him. He left two children--Harold U. Wallace, a Civil Engineer, and Mrs. Birdena Wallace Le May.

TECHNICAL SOCIETIES TO WHICH MR. WALLACE BELONGED

Honorary Member and Past-President, Western Society of Engineers in Chicago, Illinois.

Honorary Member and Past-President, American Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way Association.

Member of Institute of Consulting Engineers of America.
Member of Institution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain.

Member and Past-President, American Society of Civil Engineers.

During Mr. Wallace's administration as President in 1900, the American Society of Civil Engineers was the guest of the Institute of Civil Engineers of Great Britain and held its annual convention that year in the Society House of the Institute of Civil Engineers, at which convention Mr. Wallace delivered the regular annual address.

During this visit to London Mr. and Mrs. Wallace were personally presented to Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle.

DEGREES Mr. Wallace held the degree of Civil Engineer from the University of Wooster, Ohio–Degree of Doctor of Literary Laws from Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois–Degree of Doctor of Science from Armour Institute, Chicago, Illinois.

CLUBS
CHICAGO
Union League-Chicago Club-South Shore Country Club-

Engineers Club-City Club-Association of Commerce-
Press Club.

WASHINGTON

Metropolitan-Cosmos.

NEW YORK-
Union League-Sleepy Hollow Country Club-Engineers

Club-Engineers Country Club-Bankers Club of Amer-
ica-Cha of Commerce-Automobile Club of Amer-
ica-National Arts Club— Railroad Club.

Prepared by George W. Kittredge, Chairman; L. A. Downs, L. C. Fritch, Howard G. Kelley, Hunter McDonald, A. W. Johnston, H. R. Stafford, Committee.

[graphic][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »