Page images
PDF
EPUB

things in the profession, a man who was a loyal American, and who went overseas at a time of life when one might be expected to remain at home. It is my privilege to come here to bring a testimonial as to Colonel Webb's worth as a man on behalf of the Engineering Faculty of the University of Michigan, and of the Engineers of Eastern Michigan, who came to know Colonel Webb as a good Engineer, a good citizen and a good and lovable man.

I hope that this Association will always keep his memory green.

Mr. E. T. Howson (Railway Age) :-I desire to pay further tribute to the memory of Colonel Webb. It was my privilege to come in frequent contact with him in recent years, and I never met him but what I came away with a feeling of inspiration. He had the faculty of inspiring those with whom he came in contact in that way.

His engineering work constitutes a sufficient monument to his engineering and executive ability, while the citations which he received in service overseas constitute the monument to the services he rendered our country in the recent conflict. But it is in connection with the inspiration which he was to those with whom he came in contact that I desire to give expression. It was my observation that there are few men who have commanded to the same extent not only the respect, but the sincere affection of their associates, and the members of their organization, as Colonel Webb did, and it was that same impression that he left with those not in his organization, who came in contact with him.

Mr. J. F. Deimling (Michigan Central) :-I would add a tribute from the Engineering Staff of the Michigan Central Railroad, and as Colonel Webb's successor call to your minds the sterling character of this man, his outstanding honesty, and the great regard he had for his subordinates, and those with whom he came in contact in his daily work. This might be well illustrated by telling you that on his deathbed he remembered the family of a deceased employee who were in straightened circumstances, and about one of the last things he did was to provide a Christmas dinner for this family. That shows what the man was. Anyone who knew him, knew of his outstanding honesty. The simplicity of his life, in fact, was such, that probably if he were here to dictate what should be said, he would tell us not to spend too many words on his virtues.

The record he made in the war in the service of his country, and which probably ended his life, are written in the archives of our War Department, and as representing the members of the Engineering Staff of the Michigan Central Railroad I desire to add my tribute to the great worth of this man.

Mr. A. S. Baldwin (Illinois Central) :-I was not a familiar of Colonel Webb’s, but met him on a number of occasions professionally. He was a very fine character, and a very able man. I have never dealt with a man whom I believed to be fairer or more straight in his dealings than Colonel Webb was, and at the call of his country he entered the service of the United States, and was in Europe for the entire period of the war. He attained distinction as a Colonel of the United States Army.

COMMITTEE REPORTS

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

TERMINALS

A. MONTZHEIMER, Chairman;
J. E. ARMSTRONG,
F. J. ACKERMAN,
J. H. BRINKERHOFF,
J. D'ESPOSITO,
A. W. EPRIGHT,
REUBEN HAYES,
J. B. HUNLEY,
F. E. MORROW,
0. MAXEY,
H. J. PFEIFER,
C. E. SMITH,
C. H. SPENCER,
E. E. R. TRATMAN,

Hadley Baldwin, Vice-Chairman;
C. A. BRIGGS,
MILES BRONSON,
A. E. CLIFT,
L. G. CURTIS,
H. T. DOUGLAS, JR.,
E. M. HASTINGS,
L. J. F. HUGHES,
D. B. JOHNSTON,
B. H. Mann,
C. H. MOTTIER,
S, S. ROBERTS,
J. G. WISHART,

Committee.

To the American Railway Engineering Association:

Your Committee on Yards and Terminals herewith respectfully submits its report to the Twenty-third Annual Convention.

(1) Manual

Considering that a new Manual is to be issued in 1921, it was decided there would be no necessity for changes in the Manual at this time.

(2) Unit Operation of Railway Terminals

On account of the disturbed conditions due to change from Railroad Administration to Corporate Management, it was thought best to continue the subject for another year.

(3) Passenger Station, Freight House and Grain Weighing Scales

Inasmuch as the Interstate Commerce Commission, in its decision in the case Docket 9009, has approved a specification for grain weighing scales in connection with the question of claims for loss and damage of grain, even though such specification is not yet made standard for the railroads, the Sub-Committee has made no study of that subject on its own account.

The Sub-Committee has made progress in the matter of preparing a specification for passenger depot and freight house scales, including motor truck scales, and expects to put before the members of the Association at least a tentative draft thereof prior to the date of the next annual meeting.

(4) Handling of Freight, Etc. In Appendix A, the Committee submits its report. On account of the rapid development in the art of handling and storing freight in multiplestoried freight houses and warehouses it is recommended that this subject be carried over another year and that a study be made of the various methods of handling L.C.L. freight.

A

« PreviousContinue »