Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

(7) (a) TESTS OF TIE PLATES SUBJECT TO BRINE DRIPPINGS; (b) EFFECT OF BRINE DRIPPINGS

ON TRACK APPLIANCES

G. W. HEGEL, Chairman;

T. T. IRVING, W. P. WILTSEE,

J. DEN. MACOMB, G. H. BREMNER,

F. H. MCGUIGAN, JR., H. G. CLARK,

J. H. REINHOLDT, E. T. Howson,

Sub-Committee. Tie plates were installed in the tracks of the Chicago Junction Railway Company at the Union Stockyards during the months of May, June and July, for the purpose of securing data as to their life under the effect of brine drippings.

These plates were installed on tangent track, where all loaded and iced refrigerator cars from all packing plants are shifted. There is an average of 600 cars daily passing over these tracks, which cars are shifted backward and forward in classifying them, over the track in which these plates are installed. Fully 40 per cent of these cars are refrigerators, and are switched backward and forward several times over these tracks before the entire train is classified.

The two tracks where the tie plates are installed are on an average 18 inches higher than adjacent tracks, and even though stone ballast is used, good drainage cannot be obtained, as there is considerable slime of a greasy nature dripping from these cars, which prevents good drainage.

On account of the traffic as well as the salt brine, it is necessary to renew rails at least once a year, due principally to corrosion.

When the plates were installed, ties were removed when not in good condition and replaced by new ones; joints and rails were renewed, if in poor condition, so that it would not be necessary to disturb the tie plates in making repairs for some time.

Analyses have been made of all plates installed for test, as well as all material used in treating them.

There were 1,329 of these tie plates installed, as follows:
Kinds of Plates

No. Installed Date Installed Malleable iron

150 May 23, 1921 Low carbon

150 May 25, 1921 Wolhaupter soft steel (untreated)

June 5, 1921 Wolhaupter copper alloy..

100

June 1, 1921 Wrought iron (leadized)

100 June 10, 1921 Wrought iron (untreated)

150 June 15, 1921 Pure iron

79 July 6, 1921 Rolled steel (untreated)

100 July 6, 1921 Rolled steel NO-OX-ID

100 July 6, 1921 Rolled hot tar

100 July 6, 1921 Rolled Texas No. 45

100 July 6, 1921 High carbon

100

July 21, 1921

100

Besides the above, there are one hundred and seventy-five (175) high carbon plates which are installed in an independent test-one-half untreated and the other half treated with the Texas Company's Çarter Grease.

It will be several years before a final report can be made. As these plates have been installed less than one year, the Committee has nothing to report other than progress.

(8) INVESTIGATION ON REDUCTION OF TAPER OF TREAD TO 1 IN 38 AND ON CANTING THE RAIL

IN TRACK INWARD

E. A. HADLEY, Chairman;
W. P. WILTSEE,
J. B. BAKER,
R. A. BALDWIN,
G. H. BREMNER,

H. G. CLARK,
E. T. HOWSON,
T. T. IRVING,
F. H. MCGUIGAN, JR.,
J. B. MYERS,

Sub-Committee.

The information which has been secured is so conflicting that it is impossible for the Committee, at this time, to submit a final report and recommendation on this question.

With the thought in mind that the position of the tread of the wheel on the head of the rail would have considerable effect on the rail itself either through internal stresses or by wear on the top or gage side of the rail, and in line with the instruction of the Board of Direction, the co-operation of the Committee on Rail was requested in the consideration of this subject.

The Chairman of the Committee on Rail has appointed a SubCommittee to go further into this question with Sub-Committee (8) of the Track Committee, but as yet no joint meetings of these two subcommittees have been held.

The Canadian Pacific Railway Company advises, through its Chief Engineer, that they have used tie plates on that railway since 1914 which are inclined to a slope of 1 in 20 and are securing excellent results in so far as the wear on the head of the rail is concerned.

The Pennsylvania System has been experimenting with canting the rail inward as far back as 1907 and a report of this test made in the latter part of 1920 states that some of this rail which was laid canted in 1907 was removed in 1915, the result of the test indicating slightly less wear on the rail than when laid upright, but it was concluded that this was due in that instance to the structure of the steel rather than to the canting of the rail and that gage measurements taken at the time of each inspection throughout the life of the experiment did not indicate any great superiority for this type of track construction; however, it was considered advisable to conduct additional test with tie plates inclined to a slope of 1 in 20.

Reports of these continued tests on the Pennsylvania indicate slightly more wear on rail laid with the inclined plates and that there was practically no difference with regard to cut ties as between the inclined plates and the standard plates which place the rail in practically an upright position.

No special construction of frogs, switches and turnouts with inclined rail was provided in the tests on the Pennsylvania nor are they used in such locations on the Canadian Pacific Railway.

The New York Central Lines have reduced the incline of the whecl tread from 1 in 20, which is the Master Car Builders' Association standard, to an angle of 1 in 38 with a more favorable contour than the present M. C. B. standard.

The Northern Railway of France has recently decided to change its former practice of canting rails and in the future to lay rails in an upright position which has been and is now the practice of the Belgium Railroads.

In view of the fact that the Northern Railway of France has abandoned the general European practice of canting rails and that the railroads of Belgium have never adopted this practice, it would appear that there is a conflict of opinion in Europe as to which method constitutes the best practice. Also, the rather meager information available in the United States on which a definite conclusion can be based, there being but a small percentage of mileage equipped with canted rail, secms inadvisable at this time to attempt to draw any definite conclusions on this subject.

With new wheel treads and new rail heads, it is, without doubt, possible to procure a more central bearing on the rail, but as they both become worn the position of contact is changed from its position of central bearing, and, due to the more or less flexible track structure, the point of contact on the head of the rails and on the tread of the wheels will vary according to the degree of wear on the majority of the wheels in the trains running over the track in question.

To carry the practice of canting rail to its final theoretical conclusion would require that switches, frogs and turnouts be constructed with inclined rail, as is done in Europe, so that the numerous twists in rail from an inclined to an upright position, in passing through turnouts, might be avoided, but so far as our investigation discloses, no railroads in the United States have yet gone to this extent in their experiments or practice, due to the expense and inconvenience of such special inclined rail construction.

In vicw of the situation developed to date, it seems advisable that the study of this subject be continued in conjunction with the Rail Committee and with the Mechanical Division of the American Railway Association. It should be possible to arrive at some definite conclusion as to the relation of the tread of the wheels to the rail in a track structure to the end that the most economical and satisfactory practice may be adopted, taking into consideration the relative wear on wheels and rail and the comparative costs of maintenance of track and equipment, both of which must be given proper weight in arriving at the final net financial results.

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »