Page images
PDF
EPUB

REPORT OF COMMITTEE XIII-WATER SERVICE

A. F. DORLEY, Chairmian;
R. C. BARDWELL,
S. C. BEACH,
J. H. DAVIDSON,
B. W. DEGEER,
G. B. FARLOW,
J. H. GIBBONEY,
E. M. Grime,
W. C. HARVEY.
R. L. HOLMES,
H. H. JOHNTZ,
C. H. Koyi,

C. R. KNOWLES, Vice-Chairman;
P. M. LABach,
E. G. LANE,
THOMAS LEES,
M. E. McDONNELL,
W. M. NEPTUNE,
W. A. PARKER,
E. H. Olson,
A. B. PIERCE,
T. D. SEDWICK,
F. D. YEATON,

Committee.

To the American Railway Engineering Association:

Your Committee on Water Service presents below, its report to the Twenty-third Annual Convention on the following subjects :

(1) Revision of the Manual Report of Sub-Committee on this subject appears in Appendix A. (2) Supply of Drinking Water on Trains and Premises of

Railroads
A progress report on this subject appears in Appendix B.

(3) Specifications for Contracting Water Service Work The Sub-Committee, to date, has been unable to arrange the data secured on this subject in suitable form for presentation to the Association and desires to report progress. (4) Effect of Local Deposits on Pollution of Surface or Shallow

Well Water Supplies A collection of typical instances which completes the report on this subject is presented in Appendix C.

(5) Pitting and Corrosion of Boiler Tubes and Sheets A progress report on this subject is submitted in Appendix D. (6) Specifications for Various Chemicals Used in Water

Treatment A final report on this subject is submitted in Appendix E for adoption and publication in the Manual.

(7) Centrifugal Pumps for Railway Water Service A report on this subject appears in Appendix F.

(8) Standard Specifications At the suggestion of the Standardization Committee and by authority of the Board of Direction, the standard specifications of the American Water Works Association covering cast iron pipe and special castings and hydrants and values are submitted in Appendix G for the approval of this Association.

(9) University Work Brief reference to work recently done, or now in progress at Universities in connection with water supply problems is given in Appendix H.

CONCLUSIONS

Your Committee requests the following action on its report:

(1) That report of the Sub-Committee be received as information; that the definitions given be approved and inserted in the Manual; and that the subject of examination of the subject-matter in the Manual be again referred to the Committee for further study and report.

(2) That the report on progress of drinking water regulations be received as information and that the subject be reassigned to the Committee for further study and report.

(3) That the subject of specifications for contracting water service work be reassigned to the Committee for further study and report.

(4) That the final report on effect of local deposits on the pollution of surface and shallow well water supplies be received as information.

(5) That the progress report on the study of pitting and corrosion of boiler tubes and sheets be received as information, and that the subject be reassigned to the Committee for further study and report.

(6) That the report on Specifications for the various chemicals used in water treatment be adopted and published in the Manual.

(7) That the report on centrifugal pumps for railway water service be received as information.

(8) That the specifications of the American Water Works Association covering cast iron pipe and special castings, and hydrants and valves be adopted and published in the Manual.

(9) That the reference to work of interest to railway water supply being done at Universities be accepted as information.

Suggested Subjects for Next Year's Study and Report

(1) Study of subject-matter in the Manual with view to recommendations for changes.

(2) Study of progress of regulations of Federal or State Authorities pertaining to drinking water supplies.

(3) Study and final report on specifications for contracting railway water service work.

(4) Study and report on pitting and corrosion of boiler tubes and sheets, taking into consideration the character of the metal used, method of manufacture, construction of boilers, and quality of water.

(5) Study and report on use of oil engines in railway pumping stations.

(6) Study and report on value of water treatment to railroads.

(7) Study and report on standard methods of water analysis and interpretation of results.

(8) Study and report on relative merits of cast iron, steel, wood and other materials for pipe lines.

Respectfully submitted,
COMMITTEE ON WATER SERVICE,,

A. F. DORLEY, Chairman.

Appendix A

(1) REVISION OF MANUAL

F. D. YEATON, Chairman;
G. B. FARLOW,
E. G. LANE,
W. M. NEPTUNE,

H. H. JohnTz,
W. H. PARKER,
W. C. Harvey,

Sub-Committee.

Due to an oversight, the following definition for a continuous treating plant was omitted last year. The Water Service Committee voted to insert it in the new Manual, because there is a definition for an intermittent treating plant and without a definition for a continuous plant, the definitions would not be complete. CONTINUOUS Plant.-"One so designed that the untreated water may be

pumped to it without interruption and where the volume of the chambers through which it passes before flowing to storage is sufficient for complete chemical reaction and precipitation."

The Committee has added the following explanatory note at the bottom of Table 2, shown on page 450 of the 1915 Manual:

“Table is based on use of calcium oxide or lump lime. To obtain equivalent value for hydrated lime, multiply lime value shown in table by 1.32.”.

Under definitions published in Volume 21 for insertion in the new Manual, the following corrections have been made: Group A, third item, eighth and twenty-second words "strainer" to read "screen,” to conform with the sixth item.

Considering the definitions, the word “penstock” has been eliminated in question 23, under "Examination Questions for the Care of Boilers."

The Committee recommends the following additions and changes in the new Manual:

Under Definitions of Terms used in Railway Water Service, Group G, are definitions for single and double-acting pumps. The following definition for a double-stroke pump should be added : DOUBLE-STROKE DEEP WELL PUMP.-One that employs two separate bal

anced lines of pump rods and attached water pistons. The two lines of pump rods and their respective pistons alternate with each other in such a way that the weight, or load, lifted by each rod is carried

only in its tension, or upstroke. ALKALI WATER.-A term in common use, meaning water containing in

solution any compound of sodium or potassium in appreciable amounts. CORROSION.—The eating away of the surface of metal by chemical action,

either regularly and slowly as by rusting in air, or irregularly and rapidly as by pitting and grooving in the interior of boilers.

STUDY OF PROGRESS OF REGULATIONS OF FEDERAL OR STATE HEALTH AUTHORITIES PERTAINING

TO DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES

S. C. Beach, Chairman;
R. C. BARDWELL,
J. H. DAVIDSON,
J. H. GIBBONEY,

M. E. McDONNELL,
A. B. PIERCE,
T. W. SEDWICK,

Sub-Committee.

In the study of this subject due consideration has been given to published methods and laws promulgated by the United States Public Health Service and the facts and methods ascertained from both published and personal contact with health authorities from the various states in which the railroads operate, together with the sanitary officers now assigned to duty throughout the United States from the Government Health Service co-operating with the state health authorities for betterment of sanitary conditions connected with and maintained by Interstate Carriers. Surveys of several coach yards and the handling of drinking water have already been made by these men.

The revised edition of the Interstate Quarantine Regulations of May, 1921, published by the United States Health Service of the Treasury Department contains information for the guidance of all concerned. The Standard Railway Sanitary Code originally prepared by the Committee on Health and Medical Relief of the United States Railroad Administration, amended by the Conference of State and Provincial Officers of Health, May 25, 1920, and adopted by twelve States up to the present time, is in conformity with the Quarantine Regulations and contains information applicable to the Railways.

The Interstate Quarantine Regulations and Standard Railway Sanitary Code furnish full information on subjects pertaining to railway sanitation and laws governing same and is recommended to the notice of all concerned.

Your Committee desires to call attention to the regulations directing the notification of health authorities as to location of supply points and ownership of sources, this to be done twice yearly with proper certification and permission of Surgeon General for use of water on Interstate Carriers. The posting of signs forbidding use of water considered unsafe for public use in now done by Federal or State health authorities and notice is signed either by the United States Public Health Service, or the State health authorities or both, thus relieving the railroads of this responsibility. The collection of water samples from indicated sources of supply is performed in most of the States by the State health authorities, the iced containers being shipped by the railroads to the State Laboratories for analysis. The examination is usually without cost to the railroad.

« PreviousContinue »