The History and Antiquities of the Town and Port of Hastings

Front Cover
W.G. Moss, 1824 - Hastings (England) - 206 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 112 - TIME rolls his ceaseless course. The race of yore Who danced our infancy upon their knee, And told our marvelling boyhood legends store, Of their strange ventures happ'd by land or sea, How are they blotted from the things that be ! How few, all weak and withered of their force, Wait, on the verge of dark eternity, Like stranded wrecks, the tide returning hoarse, To sweep them from our sight! Time rolls his ceaseless course.
Page 93 - To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting: Know ye, that we of our special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, have given and granted, and by these presents, for us, our heirs and successors, do give and grant...
Page 101 - Like unto bells when they're well rung ; Then ring your bells well if you can; Silence is best for every man. But if you ring in spur or hat Sixpence you pay, be sure of that ; And if a bell you overthrow Pray pay a groat before you go. "1756.
Page 108 - I am Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the Ending, the First and the Last, who is, who was, and who is to come, the Almighty.
Page 127 - ... and declared to be one body corporate and politic, in fact and in name, by the name, style, or title mentioned and described in the said certificate so to be recorded as aforesaid, and by that name shall have succession, and they and their successors shall and may forever...
Page 47 - ... of their enemies. Then the duke commanded his horsemen to charge ; but the English received them upon the points of their weapons, with so lively courage, in so firm and stiff order, that the overthrow of many of the foremost, did teach their followers to adventure themselves with better advice. Hereupon they shifted into wings, and made way for the footmen to come forward. Then did both armies join in a horrible...
Page 78 - They thought it should have canopied their bones Till doomsday ; but all things have their end : Churches and cities, which have diseases like to men, Must have like death that we have.
Page 175 - I could very plainly see the cliffs on the opposite coast, which, at the nearest part, are between forty and fifty miles distant, and are not to be discerned from that low situation, by the aid of the best glasses. They appeared to be only a few miles off, and seemed to extend, for some leagues, along the coast. I pursued my walk along the shore...
Page 49 - English could not bŁ broken by strength of arm, he gave direction that his men should retire and give ground ; not loosely, not disorderly, as in a fearful and confused haste, but advisedly and for advantage ; keeping the Front of their squadron firm and close, without disbanding one foot in array. Nothing was more hurtful to the English, being of a frank and noble spirit, than that their violent inclination carried them too fast into hope of victory. For, feeling their enemies to yield under their...
Page 63 - The walls, nowhere entire, are about eight feet thick. The gateway, now demolished, was on the north side, near the northernmost angle. Not far from it, to the west, are the remains of a small tower enclosing a circular flight of stairs ; and still farther westward, a sallyport and the ruins of another tower.

Bibliographic information