Peterson's Magazine, Volumes 69-70

Front Cover
C.J. Peterson, 1876 - American literature
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 187 - For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality; then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?
Page 104 - The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward, forevermore.
Page 35 - Plead my cause, O Lord, with them that strive with me : Fight against them that fight against me.
Page 104 - You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this Declaration and support and defend these States. Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.
Page 187 - I have been in the deep ; in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.
Page 178 - We go to Congress at nine, and there we stay, most earnestly engaged in debates upon the most abstruse mysteries of state, until three in the afternoon ; then we adjourn, and go to dine with some of the nobles of Pennsylvania at four o'clock, and feast upon ten thousand delicacies, and sit drinking Madeira, Claret, and Burgundy, till six or seven, and then go home fatigued to death with business, company, and care.
Page 178 - A wife! Well, my dear Marquis, I can hardly refrain from smiling to find you are caught at last I saw, by the eulogium you often made on the happiness of domestic life in America, that you had swallowed the bait, and that you would as surely be taken, one day or another, as that you were a philosopher and a soldier. So your day has at length come. I am glad of it, with all my heart and soul. It is quite good enough for you. Now...
Page 103 - This committee was appointed on the 1 1th, and consisted of Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia ; John Adams, of Massachusetts ; Benjamin Franklin, of Pennsylvania ; Roger Sherman, of Connecticut ; and Robert R. Livingston, of New York.
Page 104 - the greatest question was decided that ever was debated in America; and greater, perhaps, never was or will be decided among men. A resolution was passed, without one dissenting colony, ' that these United States are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states.
Page 103 - That these united colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states ; and that all political connection between us and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.

Bibliographic information