The Central Law Journal, Volume 84

Front Cover
Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, 1917 - Law
Vols. 65-96 include "Central law journal's international law list."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 342 - The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the courts. A constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by the judges, as a fundamental law. It therefore belongs to them to ascertain its meaning, as well as the meaning of any particular act proceeding from the legislative body.
Page 383 - ... German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the government and people of the United States; that it formally accept the status of belligerent which has thus been thrust upon it; and that it take immediate steps not only to put the country in a more thorough state of defense but also to exert all its power and employ all its resources to bring the Government of the German Empire to terms and end the war.
Page 197 - Act.) In any case not provided for in this act, the rules of law and equity, including the law merchant...
Page 47 - It is a maxim not to be disregarded, that general expressions, in every opinion, are to be taken in connection with the case in which those expressions are used. If they go beyond the case, they may be respected, but ought not to control the judgment in a subsequent suit when the very point is presented for decision.
Page 189 - ... important. It is true that the music is not the sole object, but neither is the food, which probably could be got cheaper elsewhere. The object is a repast in surroundings that to people having limited powers of conversation, or disliking the rival noise, give a luxurious pleasure not to be had from eating a silent meal.
Page 233 - This provision is made in a constitution intended to endure for ages to come, and consequently to be adapted to the various crises of human affairs.
Page 382 - And statesmen at her council met Who knew the seasons when to take Occasion by the hand, and make The bounds of freedom wider yet 'By shaping some august decree, Which kept her throne unshaken still, Broad-based upon her people's will, And compass'd by the inviolate sea.
Page 342 - The complete independence of the courts of justice is peculiarly essential in a limited Constitution. By a limited Constitution, I understand one which contains certain specified exceptions to the legislative authority; such, for instance, as that it shall pass no bills of attainder, no ex-post-facto laws, and the like.
Page 433 - It is agreed that creditors on either side, shall meet with no lawful impediment to the recovery of the full value in sterling money, of all bona fide debts heretofore contracted.
Page 196 - That a person to whom an order bill has been duly negotiated acquires thereby — (a) Such title to the goods as the person negotiating the bill to him had or had ability to convey to a purchaser In good faith for value, and also such title to the goods as the consignee and consignor had or had power to convey to a purchaser in good faith for value; and (b) The direct obligation of the carrier to hold possession of the goods for him according to the terms of the bill as fully as if the carrier had...

Bibliographic information