Annual Report of the Board of Education Together with the ... Annual Report of the Secretary of the Board, Volume 22

Front Cover
1st-72nd include the annual report of the Secretary of the Board.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 221 - April, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, no child under the age of fifteen years shall be employed to labor in any manufacturing establishment, unless such child shall have attended some public or private day school, where instruction is given by a teacher qualified...
Page 15 - I promised God that I would look upon every Prussian peasant child as a being who could complain of me before God if I did not provide for him the best education as a man and a Christian which it was possible for me to provide.
Page 44 - ... among the several towns in proportion to the number of persons in each between the ages of four and sixteen years, as ascertained from said returns ; and he shall transmit the amount distributed to each town to its treasurer, on the application of its school visitors, or...
Page 145 - ... the principles of piety, justice, and a sacred regard to truth, love to their country, humanity, and universal benevolence, sobriety, industry and frugality, chastity, moderation and temperance, and those other virtues which are the ornament of human society, and the basis upon which a republican constitution is founded...
Page 39 - ... respective population as determined by the last preceding United States census, excluding Indians on reservations. But cities that have special school laws receive their due share separate and apart from the remainder of the counties in which they are situated. The New Jersey state school tax, equal to $5 for each child in the state between the ages of five and eighteen, is raised by the several counties according to their amounts of taxable property respectively, as shown by the tax rolls of...
Page 38 - January next (1835) all monies in the treasury derived from the sale of lands in the State of Maine and from the claim of the State on the government of the United States for military services, and not otherwise appropriated, together with fifty per centum of all monies thereafter to be received from the sale of lands in Maine, shall be appropriated to constitute a permanent fund for the aid and encouragement of common schools; provided, that said fund shall never exceed one million of dollars.
Page 6 - The memory is almost the only faculty regarded, and only one element of that, viz., the memory of words, while the memory of the understanding is seldom called into exercise. In my visits it was very uncommon to hear, in any of these schools, a single question or remark by the teacher which had any reference to the understanding of the children. In many cases the reading was but little more than the mechanical pronunciation of an unknown tongue. There is a text-book in daily use in all these schools,...
Page 40 - It was also stated that there were 140,000 children in the state between the ages of five and fifteen years, and it was therefore expected that the income of the fund would permit a distribution to the towns of seventy cents for each child between the afore-named ages. This certainly was a liberal expectation, compared with the results that have been attained. The distributive share of each child has amounted to only about one-third of the sum then contemplated. The committee were careful to say,...
Page 7 - ... requisite age, shall be competent and qualified, not only to enter the Grammar Schools, but to improve the privileges and advantages there offered. And in proportion as the children entering the Grammar Schools come thoroughly qualified and prepared, these schools themselves will be improved, and a large number of pupils pass through them at an age sufficiently early to allow them to enjoy the benefit of the High Schools, before the time arrives at which they wish to leave school for some active...
Page 131 - There is no office higher than that of a teacher of youth; for there is nothing on earth so precious as the mind, soul, character of the child. No office should be regarded with greater respect. The first minds in the community should be encouraged to assume it. Parents should do all but impoverish themselves, to induce such to become the guardians and guides of their children.

Bibliographic information