American Negligence Reports, Current Series: (cited Am. Neg. Rep.) All the Current Negligence Cases Decided in the Federal Courts of the United States, the Courts of Last Resort of All the States and Territories, and Selections from the Intermediate Courts, Together with Notes of English Cases and Annotations, Volume 5

Front Cover
John Milton Gardner, Walter James Eagle
Remick & Schilling, 1899 - Employers' liability
"All the current negligence cases decided in the federal courts of the United States, the courts of last resort of all the states and territories, and selections from the intermediate courts, together with notes of English cases and annotations." (varies)

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - No variance between the allegation in a pleading and the proof is to be deemed material, unless it has actually misled the adverse party to his prejudice in maintaining his action or defense upon the merits.
Page 261 - No individual, partnership, or corporation, claiming or possessing the frontage or tidal lands of a harbor, bay, inlet, estuary, or other navigable water in this State, shall be permitted to exclude the right of way to such water whenever it is required for any public purpose, nor to destroy or obstruct the free navigation of such water ; and the Legislature shall enact such laws as will give the most liberal construction to this provision, so that access to the navigable waters of this State shall...
Page 4 - At the trial, the city objected to the introduction of any evidence in behalf of the plaintiff, on the ground that the petition did not state facts sufficient to constitute a cause of action.
Page 133 - The law has so high a regard for human life that it will not impute negligence to an effort to preserve it, unless made under such circumstances as to constitute rashness in the judgment of prudent persons.
Page 45 - There must be reasonable evidence of negligence; but where the thing is shown to be under the management of the defendant or his servants, and the accident is such as in the ordinary course of things does not happen if those who have the management use proper care, it affords reasonable evidence, in the absence of explanation by the defendant, that the accident arose from want of care.
Page 655 - It is not enough that the injuries received may develop into more serious conditions than those which are visible at the time of the injury, nor even that they are likely to so develop. To entitle a plaintiff to recover present damages for apprehended future consequences there must be such a degree of probability of their occurring as amounts to a reasonable certainty that they will result from the original injury.
Page 618 - This rule Is obviously founded on the great principle of social duty, that every man, in the management of his own affairs, whether by himself or by his agents or servants, shall so conduct them as not to injure another; and if he does not, and another thereby sustains damage, he shall answer for it.
Page 343 - That the court erred in instructing the jury that if they found from the evidence that the defendant...
Page 87 - When a thing which causes injury is shown to be under the management of the defendant, and the accident is such as, in the ordinary course of things, does not happen if those who have the management use proper care, it affords reasonable evidence, in the absence of explanation by the defendant, that the accident arose from a want of care.
Page 402 - Indeed, it is to be noted in this connection that at the close of the evidence the trial court directed a verdict in favor of the local corporation and the conductor.

Bibliographic information