The American Labor Legislation Review, Volume 14

Front Cover
The Association, 1924 - Labor laws and legislation
Includes proceedings and papers of the American Association for Labor Legislation previously published in the two series: Proceedings and Legislative review.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 307 - One of the original members shall be appointed for a term of one year, one for a term of two years, one for a term of three years, one for a term of four years, and one for a term of five years...
Page 11 - Section 1. The Congress shall have power to limit, regulate and prohibit the labor of persons under eighteen years of age. Section 2. The power of the several States is unimpaired by this Article except that the operation of State laws shall be suspended to the extent necessary to give effect to legislation enacted by the Congress.
Page 97 - ... alter, control, or singly cope with. Society must see to it that it does not itself crush or weaken or damage its own constituent parts. The first duty of law is to keep sound the society it serves.
Page 75 - Congress to regulate, as obviously that power, if it is to exist, must include the authority to deal with obstructions to interstate commerce (In re Debs, 158 US 564) and with a host of other acts which, because of their relation to and influence upon interstate commerce, come within the power of Congress to regulate, although they are not interstate commerce in and of themselves.
Page 97 - ... now, if I may believe the picture which I see, there comes into the foreground the great body of the laboring people of the world, the men and women and children upon whom the great burden of sustaining the world must from day to day fall, whether we wish it to do so or not ; people who go to bed tired and wake up without the stimulation of lively hope. These people will be drawn into the field of international consultation and help, and will be among the wards of the combined governments of...
Page 98 - Convention concerning equality of treatment for national and foreign workers as regards workmen's compensation for accidents, (n) Convention concerning the simplification of the inspection of emigrants on board ship.
Page 62 - Nation at large, whose heritage these resources are. We must bend our counsels to this end. A common purpose ought to make agreement easy. Three or four matters of special importance and significance I beg that you will permit me to mention in closing. Our Bureau of Mines ought to be equipped and empowered to render even more effectual service than it renders now in improving the conditions of mine labor and making the mines more economically productive as well as more safe. This is an all-important...
Page 269 - The supreme duty of the Nation is the conservation of human resources through an enlightened measure of social and industrial justice. We pledge ourselves to work unceasingly in State and Nation for: Effective legislation looking to the prevention of industrial accidents, occupational diseases, overwork, involuntary unemployment, and other injurious effects incident to modern industry...
Page 72 - There is no power vested in Congress to require the States to exercise their police power so as to prevent possible unfair competition. Many causes may cooperate to give one State, by reason of local laws or conditions, an economic advantage over others. The Commerce Clause was not intended to give to Congress a general authority to equalize such conditions.
Page 307 - Of the members first appointed, one shall be appointed for a term of one year, one for a term of two years, one for a term of three years, one for a term of four years, and one for a term of five years...

Bibliographic information