To Provide Additional Mine Rescue Stations, Etc., Looking to Greater Sefty in the Minning Industry, Hearings Before ..., 68-1, MAy 7, 8, 22, And28, 1924

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 50 - Interior, to make diligent investigation of the methods of mining, especially in relation to the safety of miners, and the appliances best adapted to prevent accidents, the possible improvement of conditions under which mining operations are carried on, the treatment of ores and other mineral substances, the use of explosives and electricity, the prevention of accidents...
Page 25 - Mines is charged with the investigation of the methods of mining, especially in relation to the safety of miners and the appliances best adapted to prevent accidents, the possible improvement of conditions under which mining operations are carried" on, the treatment of ores and other mineral substances, the use of explosives and electricity, the prevention of accidents...
Page 98 - ... conditions affecting these industries; to Investigate explosives and peat; and on behalf of the Government to investigate the mineral fuels and unfinished mineral products belonging to, or for the use of, the United States, with a view to their most efficient mining preparation, treatment, and use; and to disseminate information concerning these subjects in such manner as will best carry out the purposes of this act SEC.
Page 49 - ... least France and England compel the use of shale or rock dust by national law. And in talking recently with the chief of the British Department of Mines I found that before the adoption of official regulations on the subject. British employers were not unlike the vast majority of our own coal mine operators. At first they wouldn't believe coal dust is explosive. When it was conclusively demonstrated in experimental mines, they then said, "Well the coal dust in my mine is not explosive!
Page 73 - The lessee shall carry out and observe regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior and in force at the date hereof relative to (1) reasonable diligence, skill, and care in the operation of said property in accordance with approved methods and practices, (2) the prevention of undue waste, and (3) the safety and welfare of miners.
Page 48 - It is the belief of the practical experts, who have just reported on this subject, that the various recommended safeguards will gradually be adopted by the industry, but they say "under present conditions it should be remembered that neither operators nor miners like to change customs and appliances with which they are familiar." "While many of us oppose so-called government paternalism," concludes the safety committee, "yet we believe it is the duty of the government to secure safety of life by...
Page 49 - Familiarity with danger has always bred contempt for it among workers in extra-hazardous occupations, and the coal miners need to feel their increasing responsibility to exercise every practicable safety precaution. But it is nonsense to say — as one editor does and as certain propagandists would have the public believe — that "the coal miner of this generation is in danger only through carelessness, his own or that of a fellow worker.
Page 51 - ... adoption of more uniform safety standards underground." It is interesting to note that our Federal experts already have up-to-date operating regulations in effect for the coal mines, now more than 100 in number, owned by the United States Government and operated under lease on the public lands.
Page 50 - Mines should have the right of entry to a mine, for the purpose of investigating mine accidents, and that their reports should be made public or delivered to the operator through the state department of mines. At present the bureau enters a mine on permission of the operator. The new thought is that an independent report on accident or disaster, by an agency not affected locally, would be beneficial to operators and to miners, and of service to the mining department of the State. ... At least it...
Page 47 - ... fatal and serious accidents at the bituminous coal mines of this country could be prevented by the universal adoption of safety methods already in successful operation at some of the mines of this country or in Great Britain. As a result of practical experience with safety legislation during fifteen years, and through our own recent studies of this subject in Europe and America, our Association has gradually drawn up, from the public point of view, a suggestive program for prevention. This has...

Bibliographic information