A Treatise on Damages: Covering the Entire Law of Damages, Both Generally and Specifically, Volume 2

Front Cover
Banks Law Publishing Company, 1903 - Damages - 2669 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Value at time of conversion
1343
Licenses Agreement by
1350
Water power supply etc 1376 Will Agreement to leave
1374
Communication of special 1419 Message ordering goods
1403
Offer to buyError of trans graph company
1416
TITLE VIII
1422
Breach of contract for use of which damages for mental
1437
Proportionate amount 1487 Estimate of value before
1469
CONTRACTS
1471
Lessee is not entitled to NegligenceRepayment
1475
BREACH OF PROMISE OF MARRIAGE
1494
Exemplary damages
1503
Marine insuranceConcur 1523 Fire riskCost of producing
1506
vented it will not overflow
1515
Measure of damagesGen 1 8 1575 Appeal and supersedeas
1563
TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE COMPANIES
1571
CHAPTER LVII
1574
INSURANCE
1588
Conveyance bond
1589
CostsBond
1590
Valued policy lawStatute liable
1591
County clerkBund
1592
County recorderBond
1593
County treasurerBond
1594
CuratorBond
1595
Drainage Commissioner
1596
Bond of 1597 Employment agents bond 1598 Execution creditorBond 1605 Same subjectInterest 1606 Same subject Expenses 1607 Same subjectA...
1644
Refusal or failure to accept 1662 Same subject continued
1649
GuardianBond
1664
Importers bond 1602 Indian agents bond 1603 Injunction bonds
1665
Same subjectMitigation
1667
damages
1668
CHAPTER LIX
1675
Goods to be shipped 1631 Goods or merchandise for 1646 Merchandise shipped to for special purpose or use eign country Failure to 1632 Special ...
1694
Goods for Christmas trade 1647 Sale to partner 1634 Delivery postponed 1648 Contract to give option
1695
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1424 - But, on the other hand, if these special circumstances were wholly unknown to the party breaking the contract, he, at the most, could only be supposed to have had in his contemplation the amount of injury which would arise generally, and in the great multitude of cases not affected by any special circumstances, from such a breach of contract.
Page 1424 - ... the damages resulting from the breach of such a contract, which they would reasonably contemplate, would be the amount of injury which would ordinarily follow from a breach of contract under these special circumstances so known and communicated.
Page 1516 - ... such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally, ie according to the usual course of things, from such breach of contract itself, or such as may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties, at the time they made the contract, as the probable result of the breach of it.
Page 1516 - Where two parties have made a contract which one of them has broken, the damages which the other party ought to receive in respect of such breach of contract should be such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally — ie, according to the usual course of things, from such breach of contract itself...
Page 1424 - ... For had the special circumstances been known, the parties might have specially provided for the breach of contract by special terms as to the damages in that case ; and of this advantage it would be very unjust to deprive them. Now the above principles are those by which we think the jury ought to be guided in estimating the damages arising out of any breach of contract.
Page 1105 - ... that the injury was caused by the negligence of a fellow servant or that the employee assumed the risk of his employment, or that the injury was due to the contributory negligence of the employee.
Page 913 - ... of another, his heirs or personal representatives may maintain an action for damages against the person causing the death, or if such person be employed by another person who is responsible for his conduct, then also against such other person. In every action under this and the preceding section, such damages may be given as under all the circumstances of the case, may be just.
Page 1133 - ... for any loss, damage, or injury by collision, or for any act, matter, or thing, loss, damage, or forfeiture, done, occasioned, or incurred, without the privity or knowledge of such owner or owners...
Page 1555 - ... the damages must be such as may fairly be supposed to have entered into the contemplation of the parties when they made the contract, that is, must be such as might naturally be expected to follow its violation; and they must be certain, both in their nature and in respect to the cause from which they proceed.
Page 1424 - In respect of such breach of contract should be such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally (ie, according to the usual course of things) from such breach of contract Itself, or as such as may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties at the time they made the contract as the probable result of the breach of it.

Bibliographic information