The Fells of Swarthmoor Hall and Their Friends: With an Accountof Their Ancestor, Anne Askew, the Martyr. A Portraiture of Religious and Family Life in the Seventeenth Century, Compiled Chiefly from Original Letters and Other Documents, Never Before Published

Front Cover
A.W. Bennett, 1865 - Quakers - 434 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 156 - ... a liberty to tender consciences, and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matter of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 133 - There is a spirit which I feel, that delights to do no evil, nor to revenge any wrong, but delights to endure all things, in hope to enjoy its own in the end: its hope is to outlive all wrath and contention, and to weary out all exaltation and cruelty, or whatever is of a nature contrary to itself.
Page 309 - Up the streets of Aberdeen, By the kirk and college green, Ilode the Laird of Ury ; Close behind him, close beside, Foul of mouth and evil-eyed, • Pressed the mob in fury. Flouted him the drunken churl, Jeered at him the serving-girl, Prompt to please her master ; And the begging carlin, late Fed and clothed at Ury's gate, Cursed him as he passed her. Yet, with calm and stately mien, Up the streets of Aberdeen Came he slowly riding ; if And, to all he saw and heard Answering not with bitter...
Page 239 - The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that from the beginning, I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them...
Page 356 - And thou, Philadelphia, the virgin settlement of this province, named before thou wert born, what love, what care, what service, and what travail, has there been to bring thee forth and preserve thee from such as would abuse and defile thee!
Page 239 - God grant my eyes may never behold the like, now seeing above 10,000 houses all in one flame ; the noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children...
Page 125 - London: and there likewise be set on the pillory, with his head in the pillory, for the space of two hours, between the hours of eleven and one, on Saturday next, in each place wearing a paper containing an inscription of his crimes; and that at the Old Exchange his tongue be bored through with a hot iron and that he be there also stigmatized in the forehead with the letter B...
Page 311 - Marvelled much that henchman bold that his laird, so stout of old, now so meekly pleaded. " Woe's the day ! " he sadly said, with a slowly-shaking head and a look of pity ; " Ury's honest lord reviled, mock of knave and sport of child, in his own good city. Speak the word, and, master mine, as we charged on Tilly's line and his Walloon lancers, smiting through their midst, we'll teach civil look and decent speech to these boyish prancers ! " " Marvel not, mine ancient friend, like beginning, like...
Page 279 - We believe they are to be read, believed, and fulfilled (he that fulfils them, is Christ) ; and they are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, and for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works, 2 Tim.
Page 310 - Prompt to please her master; And the begging carlin, late Fed and clothed at Ury's gate, Cursed him as he passed her. Yet, with calm and stately mien, Up the streets of Aberdeen Came he slowly riding: And, to all he saw and heard, Answering not with bitter word, Turning not for chiding. Came a troop with broadswords swinging, Bits and bridles sharply ringing, Loose and free and froward; Quoth the foremost, "Ride him down! Push him! prick him! through the town Drive the Quaker coward!

Bibliographic information