The Dartmouth College Causes and the Supreme Court of the United States

Front Cover
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2003 - History - 469 pages
Shirley, John M. The Dartmouth College Causes and the Supreme Court of the United States. Chicago: G.I. Jones, 1895. 469 pp. Reprinted 2003 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-337-5. Cloth. * Reprint of the first edition. Dartmouth College vs. Woodward (1816-1819) established significant precedents concerning state authority and the nature of private enterprise. Dartmouth College was incorporated under a royal charter in 1769 as a private corporation. In 1816 the New Hampshire Legislature attempted to transform the college into a state institution. Daniel Webster, representing the college trustees, convinced the Supreme Court that the royal charter was a contract that could not be invalidated by subsequent state legislation. The court concurred. Its decision initiated a significant constitutional limitation on state authority. It also helped to define corporations as relatively unregulated private economic entity that contributed to the public sphere through enlightened self-interest. Shirley offers a vivid account of the case, enriched by extensive quotation of primary archival sources.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
20
III
44
IV
66
V
81
VI
102
VII
116
VIII
142
XIII
249
XIV
277
XV
302
XVI
317
XVII
328
XVIII
345
XIX
371
XX
390

IX
167
X
187
XI
213
XII
229
XXI
411
XXII
445
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information