Reciprocity Treaties with Latin America: Message of the President of the United States and Letter of the Secretary of State Submitting the Recommendations of the International American Conference

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1890 - America - 13 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - This fact was very strongly urged, to the end that at least equal advantages should be given to the products of a friendly country with which we are endeavoring to build up a trade. Excepting raw cotton, our four largest exports during the last fiscal year were breadstuffs, provisions, refined petroleum, and lumber. The following statement shows the total exports of each of said articles in 1889, and the proportion exported to Latin America: These figures should be closely studied. It would be difficult...
Page 9 - ... end should be approached by gradual steps. The first and most efficient step in that direction is the negotiation of partial reciprocity treaties among the American nations, whereby each may agree to remove or reduce the import duties levied by it on some of the natural or manufactured products of one or more of the other nations/ in exchange for similar and equivalent advantages...
Page 4 - ... mining and mechanical machinery, structural steel and iron, steel rails, locomotives, railway cars and supplies, street cars, and refined petroleum. I mention these particular articles because they have been most frequently referred to as those with which a valuable exchange could be readily effected. The list could no doubt be profitably enlarged by a careful investigation of the needs and advantages of both the home and foreign markets. The opinion was general among the foreign delegates that...
Page 1 - American neighbors do not buy of us because we do not buy of them, or because we tax their products, has been annually contradicted by the statistics of our commerce for a quarter of a century. The lack of means for reaching their markets has been the chief obstacle in the way of increased exports. The carrying trade has been controlled by European merchants who have forbidden an exchange of commodities. The merchandise we sell in South America is carried there in American ships, or foreign ships...
Page 4 - To escape the delay and uncertainty of treaties it has been suggested that a practicable and prompt mode of testing the question was to submit an amendment to the pending tariff bill, authorizing the President to declare the ports of the United States...
Page 9 - American countries as it may be in their interest to make them, under such a basis as may be acceptable in each case, taking into consideration the special situation, conditions, and interests of each country, and with a view to promote their common welfare.

Bibliographic information