A Treatise on the Law of Collisions at Sea: With an Appendix, Containing Extracts from the Merchant Shipping Act, 1894, the Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, and Local Rules of Navigation for the Thames, Mersey, and Elsewhere

Front Cover
Stevens and Sons, 1904 - Collisions at sea - 590 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - There must be reasonable evidence of negligence, but where the thing is shown to be under the management of the defendant or his servants, and the accident is such as in the ordinary course of things does not happen if those who have the management use proper care, it affords reasonable evidence, in the absence of explanation by the defendant that the accident arose from want of care.
Page 504 - ... points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on...
Page 349 - ... use ; and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to prevent collision, in such manner as to make them most visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side.
Page 528 - Nothing in these rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner or master or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, or of any neglect to keep a proper lookout, or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.
Page 507 - Nothing in these rules shall interfere with the operation of any special rules made by the Government of any nation, with respect to additional station and signal lights for two or more ships of war or for vessels sailing under convoy, or with the exhibition of recognition signals adopted by ship-owners, which have been authorized by their respective Governments and duly registered and published.
Page 533 - When both are running free, with the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.
Page 393 - ... sees the masts of the other in a line or nearly in a line with her own, and by night to cases in which each vessel is in such a position as to see both the side lights of the other.
Page 339 - ... points abaft the beam on the starboard side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance ot at least 2 miles.
Page 393 - It does not apply by day to cases in which a vessel sees another ahead crossing her own course; or by night, to cases where the red light of one vessel is opposed to the red light of the other, or where the green light of one vessel is opposed to the green light of the other, or where a red light without a green light, or a green light without a red light, is seen ahead, or where both green and red lights are seen anywhere but ahead.
Page 503 - In the following rules every steam vessel which is under sail and not under steam is to be considered a sailing vessel, and every vessel under steam, whether under sail or not, is to be considered a steam vessel. The words " steam vessel" shall include any vessel propelled by machinery. A vessel is

Bibliographic information