Democracy in America

Front Cover
Harper Collins, 2000 - History - 778 pages
Tocqueville's monumental book is as relevant today as when it was first published in the mid-nineteenth century, and it remains the most comprehensive, penetrating, and astute picture of American life, politics, and morals ever written -- whether by an American or, as in this case, a foreign visitor. This special edition contains the entire two volumes of Democracy in America, based on the second revised and corrected text of the 1961 French edition, meticulously edited by the distinguished Tocqueville scholar J.P. Mayer.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

AUTHORS INTRODUCTION
9
PHYSICAL CONFIGURATION OF NORTH AMERICA
23
CONCERNING THEIR POINT OF DEPARTURE
31
3
50
THE PRINCIPLE OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE PEO
58
JUDICIAL POWER IN THE UNITED STATES AND
99
POLITICAL JURISDICTION IN THE UNITED STATES
106
THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION
112
CONCERNING THE PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH
429
WHY THE AMERICANS SHOW MORE APTITUDE
437
CONCERNING THE PROGRESS OF ROMAN CATHOLI
450
21
497
WHY DEMOCRATIC NATIONS SHOW A MORE ARDENT
503
HOW THE AMERICANS COMBAT THE EFFECTS
509
ON THE CONNECTION BETWEEN ASSOCIATIONS
517
HOW THE AMERICANS COMBAT INDIVIDUALISM
525

PART II
171
FREEDOM OF THE PRESS IN THE UNITED STATES
180
POLITICAL ASSOCIATION IN THE UNITED STATES
189
GOVERNMENT BY DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA
196
THE REAL ADVANTAGES DERIVED BY AMERICAN
231
THE OMNIPOTENCE OF THE MAJORITY IN
246
WHAT TEMPERS THE TYRANNY OF THE MAJORITY
262
Contents of Volume
277
SOME CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING THE PRES
316
CONCLUSION
408
AUTHORS PREFACE TO VOLUME TWO
417
PARTICULAR EFFECTS OF THE LOVE OF PHYSICAL
532
HOW DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS AND MORES
580
HOW EQUALITY HELPS TO MAINTAIN GOOD MORALS
594
ON THE GRAVITY OF THE AMERICANS AND
609
WHY THERE ARE SO MANY MEN OF AMBITION
627
APPENDIX
709
VOLUME
730
APPENDIX
736
Authors Preface to Volume
744
Index
759
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 227 - ... neutrality we may at any time resolve upon to be scrupulously respected; when belligerent nations, under the impossibility of making acquisitions upon us, will not lightly hazard the giving us provocation; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. Why forgo the advantages of so peculiar a situation?
Page 115 - The powers delegated by the proposed constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the state governments, are numerous and indefinite.
Page 45 - It being one chief project of that old deluder Satan to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times by keeping them in an unknown tongue, so in these latter times by persuading from the use of tongues...
Page 356 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Page 505 - Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations. There are not only commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but others of a thousand different types — religious, moral, serious, futile, very general and very limited, immensely large and very minute.
Page 227 - The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Page 260 - It is of great importance in a republic not only to guard the society against the oppression of its rulers, but to guard one part of the society against the injustice of the other part.
Page 115 - The powers reserved to the several states will extend to all the objects, which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people: and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the state.
Page 39 - Having undertaken, for the glory of God and advancement of the Christian faith and honor of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia...
Page 717 - Henry VIII. and his three children. It can change and create afresh even the Constitution of the Kingdom, and of Parliaments themselves, as was done by the Act of Union and the several statutes for Triennial and Septennial Elections. It can, in short, do everything that is not naturally impossible, and, therefore, some have not scrupled to call its power, by a figure rather too bold, the Omnipotence of Parliament.

About the author (2000)

Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) was born in Verneuil, France. A historian and political scientist, he came to the United States in 1831 to report on the prison system. His experiences would later become the basis for his classic study of Democracy in America.

Bibliographic information