The American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge, Volume 12

Front Cover
George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 210 - ... and also every such note payable to any person or persons, body politic and corporate, his, her or their order, shall be assignable or indorsable over in the same manner as inland bills of exchange are or may be, according to the custom of merchants...
Page 211 - It is not to be inferred from what has been said that the local assessors discover all intangible property subject to taxation, and list it at its true value.
Page 300 - Atlantic, Bergen, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Salem, Somerset, Sussex, Union, Warren...
Page 196 - That the Legislature of said State, by a Solemn Public Act, shall declare the assent of the said State to the said fundamental condition...
Page 219 - Lord Nelson has been commanded to spare Denmark when she no longer resists. The line of defence which covered her shores has struck to the British flag: but if the firing is continued on the part of Denmark, he must set on fire all the prizes that he has taken, without having the power of saving the men who have so nobly defended them. The brave Danes are the brothers, and should never be the enemies of the English.
Page 266 - Constitution), of the age of twenty-one years and upwards, who shall have actually and not constructively, resided in the State six months, and in the district or county thirty days next preceding any election, shall be entitled to vote for all officers that now are or hereafter may be elected by the people, and upon all questions submitted to the electors at such election...
Page 362 - No person shall be eligible to the Legislature, who at the time of his election, is, or within one hundred days previous thereto has been, a member of Congress, a civil or military officer under the United States, or an officer under any city government.
Page 457 - ... genealogy, and achievements of the great king. Several doorways, formed by gigantic winged lions or bulls, or by the figures of guardian deities, led into other apartments, which again opened into more distant halls. In each were new sculptures. On the walls of some were processions of colossal figures — armed men and eunuchs following the king, warriors laden with spoil, leading prisoners, or bearing presents and offerings to the gods. On the walls of others were portrayed the winged priests,...
Page 457 - These edifices were great national monuments, upon the walls of which were represented in sculpture or inscribed in alphabetic characters the chronicles of the empire. He who entered them might thus read the history and learn the glory and triumphs of the nation. They served at the same time to bring continually to the remembrance of those who assembled within them on festive occasions, or for the celebration of religious ceremonies, the deeds of their ancestors and the power and majesty of their...
Page 14 - But with the turn to imprisonment as the principal form of punishment — a movement which occurred in the latter part of the 18th and early part of the 19th century — the idea that the prison might "rehabilitate" the prisoner became more common.

Bibliographic information