Page images
PDF
EPUB

а

Alabama.—The Legislature of Ala- | February 28 from the Governor an ad bama on January 22 elected John T. interim appointment of doubtful validMorgan (D.) United States Senator to ity. On July 9 he was unanimously succeed himself for the six year term elected to succeed himself for the six ending March 3, 1913, and Edmund W. year term ending March 3, 1913. Mr. Pettus (D.) to succeed himself for the Bacon was nominated without opposisix year term ending March 3, 1915. tion in a Democratic state primary. The vote in each branch of the Legis

Idaho.-The Legislature of Idaho on lature was unanimous. Messrs. Mor

January 15 elected William E. Borah gan and Pettus were nominated in

(R.) United States Senator to succeed Democratic state primary without op

Fred T. Dubois (D.) for the six year position.

term ending March 3, 1913. The vote Mr. Morgan died on June 11 and on

in the two branches of the Legislature June 17 Governor Comer appointed

was: Senate-Borah, 14; Dubois, 6. John H. Bankhead (D.) to serve until

House of Representatives—Borah, 36; the Legislature could fill the vacancy.

Dubois, 12. Mr. Borah was nominated On July 16 he was unanimously elected by a Republican state convention. to fill the unexpired term ending March 13, 1913. Senator Pettus died

Illinois.—The Legislature of Illinois on July 27 and on August 6 Joseph H.

on January 22 elected Shelby M. CulJohnston (D.) was unanimously chosen

lom (R.) United States Senator to sucby the Legislature to fill out the un

ceed himself for the six year term endexpired term ending March 3, 1909, and

ing March 3, 1913. The vote in the two to serve for the full term ending March

branches of the Legislature was: Sen3, 1915. Mr. Bankhead and Mr. John

ate-Cullom, 44; C. C. Boggs (D.), 7. ston had both been named as "alter

House of Representatives—Cullom, 88; nate" senators at the Democratic state

Boggs, 61; Daniel R. Sheen (Pro.), 3. primary of 1906.

Mr. Cullom was nominated in a Repub

lican state primary, defeating Richard Arkansas.—The Legislature of Arkan- Yates. sas on January 29 elected Jeff Davis

on (D.) to succeed James H. Berry (D.)

Iowa.—The Legislature of Iowa for the six year term ending March 3, January 22 elected Jonathan P. Dolll1913. The vote in the two branches of

ver (R.) United States Senator to sucthe Legislature was: Senate-Davis, 30;

ceed himself for the six year term endJ. L. Worthington (R.). 1. House of

ing March 3, 1913. The vote in the Representatives—Davis, 88; Worthing

two branches of the Legislature was: ton, 4. Mr. Davis was nominated in a

Senate-Dolliver, 35; Claude R. Porter Democratic state primary.

defeating

(D.), 14, House of Representatives James H. Berry.

Dolliver, 75; Porter, 31. One Democrat

in the House voted for Mr. Dolliver, Colorado.- The Legislature of Colorado

who had been nominated unanimously elected January 15 Simon

on January 21 by a Republican caucus. Guggenheim (R.) to succeed Thomas M. Patterson (D.). for the six year

Kansas.-The Legislature of Kansas term ending March 3, 1913. The vote

on January 22 elected Charles Curtis in the two branches of the Legislature (R.) to fill out the unexpired term endwas: Senate-Guggenheim, 22; Charles ing March 3, 1907. of Joseph R. Burton S. Thomas (D.), 12. House of Repre- (R.), who resigned on June 4, 1906, and sentatives—Guggenheim,

46;

Thomas, was succeeded by A. W. Benson (R.), 15; Frank C. Goudy (R.), 4. Mr. Gug- serving by appointment. On the same genheim was nominated on January 4 day it elected Mr. Curtis for the six by a Republican caucus, receiving 67

year term ending March 3, 1913. The out of 68 votes.

vote in the two branches of the Legis

lature Delaware.—The Legislature of Dela

was as follows: (Short term)

Senate-Curtis, 36; Benson, 1; W. R. ware on January 15 elected Harry A. Richardson (R.)

Stubbs (R.), 1. House of Representato succeed J. Frank Allee (R.) for the six year term ending

tives—Curtis, 84; Benson, 18; W. A. March 3, 1913. The vote in the two

Harris (D.), 11; Edward Carroll (D.), 1. branches of the Legislature was: Senate

(Long term) Senate-Curtis, 36; Harris,

2. House - Richardson, 11; Willard Saulsbury

of Representatives—Curtis, (D.), 5. House of Representatives

86; Harris, 30; J. L. Bristow (R.), 1.
Mr.
Curtis

nominated for both Richardson, 25; Saulsbury, 10. Mr. Rich

terms by a Republican caucus held ardson was nominated on January 14 by

January 11. a Republican caucus, receiving on the ninth ballot 20 votes, to 10 votes for J. Maine.-The Legislature of Maine on Frank Allee, 2 for Caleb R. Layton, 1 January 15 elected William P. Frye (R.) for J. Edward Addicks, 1 for G. W.

United States Senator to succeed himMarshall and 1 for S. Pennewill.

self for the six year term ending March

3, 1913. The vote in the two branches Georgia. -The date for the meeting

of the Legislature was: Senate-Frye, of Georgia Legislature having been changed by constitutional amendment

23; William H. Pennell (D.), 6. House from November to June, no election was

of Representatives-Frye, 86; Pennell,

60. held in November, 1906, to fill the va

Mr. Frye was nominated unanicancy occurring on March 3, 1907, by

mously by a Republican caucus. the expiration of the term of Augustus Massachusetts.The Legislature of 0. Bacon (D.). Mr. Bacon received on Massachusetts on January 15 elected

on

was

W. Murray Crane (R.) United States New Jersey.-The Legislature of New Senator to succeed himself for the six Jersey on February 5 elected Frank O. year term ending March 3, 1913. The Briggs (R.) United States Senator to vote in the two branches of the Legis- succeed John F. Dryden (R.) for the lature was: Senate-Crane, 33; James six year term ending March 3, 1913. B. Carroll (D.), 2; Joseph H. O'Neill The vote in joint assembly was: Briggs, (D.), 1; George Fred Williams (D.), 1; 41; James E. Martine (D.), 35; John John A. Sullivan (D.), 1. House of W. Griggs (R.), 1; Mahlon R. Pitney Representatives-Crane, 174; Carroll, (R.), 1. Senator Dryden was renom46; Williams, 2. Five Democrats in the inated by a Republican caucus held on Senate and nine in the House voted for January 21, thirty-six Republicans parMr. Crane, who had been nominated ticipating. He had previously been the unanimously by a Republican caucus. successful candidate at a state primary.

Michigan.—The Legislature of Michi- On January 22 the two branches of the gan on January 15 elected William Al- Legislature voted separately without den Smith (R.) United States Senator making an election. The vote was: to succeed Russell A. Alger (R.) for the

Senate-Dryden, 12; Griggs, 2; Pitney, six year term ending March 3, 1913. 1; Edwin A. Stevens (D.), 3; Woodrow The vote in the two branches of the Wilson (D.), 2; J. R. Martine (D.). 1. Legislature was: Senate-Smith, 31. House of Representatives—Dryden, 24; House of Representatives-Smith, 92; Griggs, 3; F. O. Briggs, 2; Stevens, 13; Charles E. Townsend (R.), 2; T. E.

Wilson, 9; Martine, 8. At the joint Barkworth (D.), 2. Mr. Smith was

session of January 23 Dryden received nominated by a Republican caucus on

36 votes, Griggs 6, Pitney 2, Stevens January 10. On February 5 he was

16, Woodrow Wilson 10, James R. Marelected to

out
serve
the unexpired

tine 6 and Gottfried Krueger (D.) 6. term, ending March 3, 1907, of Russell The deadlock lasted until February 3, A. Alger, who died on January 24.

when Mr. Dryden withdrew. On Feb

ruary 5 Mr. Briggs was nominated by a Minnesota.—The Legislature of Min

Republican caucus, receiving 19 votes nesota on January 22 elected Knute

out of 37. Nelson (R.) United States Senator to succeed himself for the six year term

North Carolina.-The Legislature of ending March 3, 1913. The vote in the North Carolina on January 22 elected two branches of the Legislature was:

F. M. Simmons (D.) to succeed himself Senate Nelson, 45; Albert Schaller (D.), for the six year term ending March 3, 14; John 0. Johnson (D.), 1; Frank A.

1913. The vote in the two branches of Day (D.), 1. House of Representatives

the Legislature was: Senate-Sim- Nelson, 98; _Schaller, 13; W. J. Dean

mons, 33; Spencer B. Adams (R.), 3. (Pro.), 3. Four Democratic senators House of Representatives-Simmons, 83; votej for Mr. Nelson, who was nominat

Adams, 21; J. J. Britt (R.), 2. Mr.

Simmons was ed by a Republican state convention.

nominated by a Demo

cratic caucus. Montana.--The Legislature of Montana on January 15 elected Joseph M.

Oklahoma.—The Legislature of OklaDixon (R.) United States Senator to

homa on December 10 elected Robert L. succeed William A. Clark (D.) for the Owen (D.) and Thomas P. Gore (D.) as six year term ending March 3, 1913. the state's first United States Senators. The vote in the two branches of the The vote in the two branches of the Legislature_was: Senate-Dixon, 18; J. Legislature was: Senate-Owen, 39; Gore, K. Toole (D.), 7; H. L. Frank (D.), 2. 39; C. B. Douglas (R.), 4; C. B. Jones House of Representatives--Dixon, 52; (R.), 4. House of Representatives—Owen, Toole, 10; Frank, 4; W. C. Conrad (D.), 89; Gore, 89; Douglas, 18; Jones, 18. The 2; Norris (D.), 1.

Mr. Dixon was two Senators were nominated in a Demonominated by a Republican legislative cratic state primary. caucus.

Oregon.--The Legislature of Oregon Nebraska.-The Legislature of

Ne

January 22 elected Frederick W. braska on January 15 elected Norris Mulkey (R.) United States Senator to Brown (R.) United States Senator to

out

the unexpired term, ending succeed Joseph H. Millard (R.) for the March 3, 1907, of John H. Mitchell (R.), six year term ending March 3, 1913. who died on December 8, 1905, and who The vote in the two branches was: was succeeded on December 13, 1905, by Senate-Brown, 28; W. H. Thompson John H. Gearin (D.), appointed by the (D.), 5. House of Representatives- Governor. The vote in both branches of Brown, 67; Thompson, _31. Mr. Brown the Legislature was unanimous. On the was nominated by a Republican state same day the Legislature elected Jonaconvention,

than Bourne, jr. (R.) for the six year New Hampshire.—The Legislature of

term ending March 3, 1913. The vote

in New Hampshire on January 15 elected

the

two branches was: Senate Henry E. Burnham (R.) United States

Bourne, 23; Robert S. Bean (D.), 4. Senator to succeed himself for the six

House of Representatives-Bourne, 57; year term ending March 3, 1913. The

F. A. Moore (D.), 2; F. W. Mulkey (R.), vote in the two branches of the Legis

1. Both Mr. Mulkey and Mr. Bourne lature was: Senate-Burnham (R.), 18;

were designated for election by a popuNathan C. Jameson (D.), 6. House of

lar vote. Representatives—Burnham, 236; Jame- Rhode Island. The Legislature of son, 117; George B. Leighton, 1. Mr. Rhode Island, at the session of 1907, Burnham was nominated by a Repub

failed to elect a senator to succeed lican caucus.

George Peabody Wetmore (R.) for the

on

fill

six year term ending March 3, 1913. 2; A. W. Terrell (D.), 1; Horace ChilOn the first ballot on January 15 the ton (D.), 1; not voting, 8. House of vote in the two branches of the Legis- Representatives-Bailey, 89; T. M. lature was: Senate-Wetmore, 14; Campbell (D.), 3; John W. Logan (D.), Samuel Pomeroy Colt (R.), 17; R. H. I. 2; J. E. Yantis (D.), 2; Cecil A. Lyon Goddard (D. and I. R.), 8. House of (R.), 2; 25 scattering Democratic votes Representatives—Wetmore, 17; Colt, 22; for 25 other Democratic candidates; not Goddard, 33. The deadlock continued voting, 8. until April 23, when, on the eighty-first West Virginia.-The Legislature of and last ballot-in joint assembly-the West Virginia on January 22 elected vote stood: Wetmore, 30; Colt, 39; God- Stephen B. Elkins (R.) United States dard, 40.

Senator to succeed himself for the six

The South Carolina.—The Legislature of year term ending March 3, 1913. South Carolina on January 22 elected vote in the two branches of the LegisBenjamin R. Tillman (D.) United States lature was: Senate-Elkins, 24; John J. Senator to succeed himself for the six

Cornwell (D.), 5. House of Represen

Mr. year term ending March 3, 1913. No

tatives—Elkins, 57; Cornwell, 25. votes in opposition were cast in either Elkins was unanimously nominated by branch of the Legislature. One mem

a Republican legislative caucus. ber of the House of Representatives

Wisconsin.-The Legislature of Wisdeclined to vote.

Mr.

Tillman was consin on May 17 elected Isaac Stephennominated without opposition in a son (R.) United States Senator to sucDemocratic state primary.

ceed John C. Spooner (R.), resigned, for the

of

remainder the term South

ending Dakota.-The Legislature of South Dakota on January 22 elected

March 3, 1909. Mr. Spooner resigned Robert J. Gamble (R.) United States

on March 3, the resignation to take

effect on May 1. The first ballot was Senator to succeed himself for the six

taken year term ending March 3, 1913. The

on April 16, when the vote in vote in the two branches of the Legis

the two branches for the various candilature was: Senate-Gamble, 34; An

dates was: H. A. Cooper (R.), 18; John drew E. Lee (D.), 8; Thomas Sterling

J. Esch (R.), 18; William H. Hatten (Ind.), 3. House of Representatives

(R.), 15; Irvine L, Lenroot (R.), 19;

Isaac Stephenson (R.). 19; Emil Gamble, 66; Lee, 9; Sterling, 12. Mr. Gamble was nominated by a Republican

Baensch (R.),, 6; E. C. Winckler (R.), state convention.

3;' G. W. Bird (D.), 23; J. P. Rummel

(Soc. Dem.), 5; scattering, 5. The Tennessee.-The Legislature of Tennes- deadlock continued until May 17, when see on January 15 elected Robert L. Mr. Stephenson received 87 votes in the Taylor (D.) United States Senator to joint assembly out of 108 cast. The succeed Edward W. Carmack (D.) for Democrats present voted for Mr. Bird, the six year term ending March 3, and the Social Democrats for Mr. Rum1913. The vote in the two branches of mel. There were 25 absentees. Mr. the Legislature was: Senate--Taylor, Stephenson was nominated on May 16 25; Nathan W. Hale (R.), 5; Asbury by a Republican caucus, which held its Wright (R.), 1. House of Representa- first session on April 15. Eighty baltives—Taylor, 73; Hale, 21. Mr. Taylor lots were taken during the deadlock, was nominated in a Democratic state the chief opposing candidates being primary, defeating Senator E.

W. Messrs. Esch, Cooper, Lenroot and Carmack.

Hatten. Cooper and Lenroot withdrew Texas.-The Legislature of Texas on early in May, and on the final ballot the January 22 elected Joseph W. Bailey vote was: Stephenson, 54; Esch, 23; (D.) United States Senator to succeed Hatten, 19; scattering, 3. himself for the six year term ending Wyoming.-The Legislature of WyoMarch 3, 1913. Mr. Bailey was nom- ming on January 22 elected Francis E. inated at a Democratic state primary, Warren (R.) United States Senator to but owing to the fact that charges were succeed himself for the six year term made against him and were being in- ending March 3, 1913. The vote in the vestigated by a joint committee of the two branches of the Legislature was: Legislature at the time the election was Senate-Warren, 21; Colin Hunter (D.), held many Democratic senators and 2. House of Representatives—Warren, representatives refused to support him. 43; Hunter, 4. Mr. Warren was unaniThe vote in the two branches was: mously nominated by a Republican legSenate-Bailey, 19; W. L. Cabell (D.), I islative caucus. COMMERCIAL FAILURES IN THE UNITED STATES, 1877-1906.

Reported by R. G. Dun & Co.
Fail-
Fail-

Fail-
-Year. ures.

-Year. ures. Liabilities. Year. ures. Liabilities. 1877. 8,872 ($190, 669,936||1887.. 9,634 |$167,560,944|| 1897. 13,351 $154,332,071 1878.. 10,478 234,383, 1321888.. 10,679 128, 829,978 1898.. 12,186 130, 662,899 1879.. 6,658 98,149,063 1889.. 10,882 148,784,337 1899.. 9,337 90,879,889 1880..

4,735 65,752,000 1890.. 10,907 189,856,964 1900.. 10,774 138,495, 673 1881..

5,582 81, 155,932 | 1891. 12, 273 189,868,638 1901.. 11,002 113,092,376 1882. 6,738

101,547,5641|1892. 10,344 114,044,167 1902., 11,615 117,476,769 1883.. 9,184 172,874,172||1893. 15, 242 346,779,889|| 1903.. 12,069 155,444,185 1884.. 10,968 226,343,427 1894. 13,885 172,992,856]]1904.. 12,199 144,202,311 1885. 10,637 124, 220,321 1895. 13,197 173, 196,0601 (1905.. 11,520 102,676,172 1886..

9,834 114, 644, 1191 1896. 10,088 226,096,834||1906.. 10,682 119, 201,515

[ocr errors]

Liabilities. It

are

are

THE REVISED NEW-YORK CITY CHARTER. A revision of the charter of the city of New-York, which was drawn up by the Charter Revision Commission and passed in an amended form April 4, 1901, by the legislature, was subsequently approved by Governor Odell, and therefore is now a law. After its passage several supplementary acts were passed by the legislature, and these also are laws.

The legislative power of the city was vested in two houses, known respectively as the Council and the Board of Aldermen. The charter revision conferred all legislative

power upon a Board of Aldermen. The aldermen were to be elected The Board of in November, 1901, and every two years thereafter. The president Aldermen. of the Board of Aldermen is elected every four years by the city at large. There

seventy-three aldermanic districts, consisting of one in each Assembly district in the counties

of greater NewYork, with the exception that two representatives each

granted to the XXIst, XXIIId, XXXIst and XXXIVth Assembly districts of New-York County, four representatives to the XXXVth Assembly District of New-York, two to Chester, New-York County, two to the town of New-Utrecht, in the Borough of Brooklyn, two to the town of Newtown in Queens County, two to the town of Jamaica in Queens County, one to the town of Castleton, one to the towns of Middletown and Southfield, and one to the towns of Northfield and Westfield-the last five named towns all in Richmond County. The president of the Board of Aldermen possesses all the powers of the Mayor during his disability or absence. The Aldermen receive salaries of $2,000 a year.

No ordinance can be passed except by a vote of a majority of all the members of the Board of Aldermen. The act says that "in case the ordinance or resolution involves

the xpenditure money, the creation of a debt, or the Powers of the Board laying of an assessment, it shall require a vote of threeof Aldermen.

fourths of all the members of the Board of Aldermen to

pass it over the Mayor's veto; and if it involves the grant of a franchise, the Mayor's veto shall be final." It declares that "the Board of Aldermen shall have power to make, establish, alter, modify, amend and repeal all ordinances, rules, and police, health, park, fire and building regulations." Also that "the Board of Aldermen is authorized to grant from time to time to any corporation thereunto duly authorized the franchise or right to construct and operate railways in, upon, over, under and along streets, avenues, waters, rivers, public places, park ways or highways of the city, but no such grant shall be made except upon the limitations and conditions of this act elsewhere provided in respect of the grant by the Board of Aldermen of franchises and rights in or under the streets, avenues, waters, rivers, public places, parkways and highways of the city." The Board of Aldermen is given authority to pass ordinances in regard to theatres, the markets, the hotels, the fire limits, use of vaults, and to fix the annual fee, not exceeding $20, for each streetcar used in the city. The act further says: It shall be the duty of the Board of Aldermen, upon the recommendation of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, to fix the salary of every officer or person whose compensation is paid out of the city treasury other than_day laborers and teachers, examiners and members of the supervising staff of the Department of Education, irrespective of the amount fixed by this act, except that no change shall be made in the salary of an elected officer or head of a department during his tenure of office. The Board of Aldermen may reduce, but may not increase, any salary recommended by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment; but the action of the Board of Aldermen on reducing any salary so recommended shall be subject to the veto power of the Mayor, as provided in Section 40 of this act. In case the Board of Aldermen shall vote to reduce more than one salary, the Mayor may approve the reduction of one or more salaries, and may disapprove the reduction of others. In such case the reductions he shall approve shall become elfective; and as to those which he shall not approve, the recommendations of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment shall become effective unless the reductions be again passed by a three-fourths vote of the Board of Aldermen."

In regard to franchises the act says: "After the approval of this act no franchise or right to use the streets, avenues, waters, rivers, parkways or highways of the city

shall be granted by the Board of Aldermen to any person or Franchises. corporation for longer period than twenty-five years, except

as hereinafter provided, but such grant may at the option of the city provide for giving to the grantee the right on a fair revaluation or revaluations to renewals not exceeding in the aggregate twenty-five years. Nothing in the foregoing provisions of this section contained shall apply to consents granted to tunnel railroad corporations, and the Board of Aldermen is hereby authorized in its discretion to grant a franchise or right to any railroad corporation to use any of said streets, avenues, waters, rivers, parkways or highways in the city of New-York for the construction and operation of a tunnel railroad underneath the surface thereof for any period not exceeding fifty years, and any such grant may at the option of the city pro vide for giving to the grantee the right, on a fair revaluation or revaluations, to renewals not exceeding in the aggregate twenty-five years, provided, however, that any grant to construct a tunnel railroad or renewal thereof shall only be made after an agreement has been entered into by such a tunnel corporation to pay to the city of New-York at least 3 per centum of the net profits derived from the use of any tunnel which it shall construct, after there shall have first been retained by such company

a

from such net profits a sum equal to 3 per centum upon the sum expended to construct such tunnel."

The Mayor of the city, the charter revision provided, should be elected in November, 1901, for a term of two years, and every two years thereafter for a like period.

In 1905 the charter was amended so as to extent the mayoralty term Powers of the to four years. The salary of the Mayor is $15,000 a year. The Mayor Mayor.

may, whenever in his judgment the public interests shall so re

quire, remove from office any public officer holding office by appointment from him, except members of the Board of Education, Aqueduct Commissioners, trustees of the College of the City of New York, trustees of Bellevue and Allied Hospitals, and except also judicial officers for whose removal other provision is made by this constitution."

The administrative departments are as follows: Department of Finance, Law Department, Police Department, Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, De

partment of Street Cleaning, Department of Bridges, DepartAdministrative ment of Parks, Department of Public Charities, Department Departments. of Correction, Fire Department, Department of Docks and

Ferries, Department of Taxes and Assessments, Department of Education, Department of Health, Tenement House Department. The head of the Department of Finance is the Controller, who is to be elected at the same time with the Mayor, and is to have like him a term of two-since 1905, four-years. All of the departments are single headed commissions, except the Park Department, which has three commissioners; the Department of Taxes and Assessments, which has five; the Department of Education, forty-six members of a Board of Education, and the Department of Health, which has three commissioners (two ex-officio).

The Mayor must at least once a year submit to the Board of Aldermen a general statement of the finances, government and improvements of the city, keep himself

informed as to the doings of the several departments and Duties of the Mayor. be vigilant in enforcing the ordinances of the city and the

laws of the State. The Mayor appoints besides those already named all members of any board authorized to superintend the erection or repair of any building belonging to the city, inspectors of weights and measures, two commissioners of accounts and five Civil Service Commissioners.

The Controller has control of the fiscal concerns of the corporation. The accounts of every department are subject to his inspection and revision. All

claims against the city, except certain specified ones, are Controller, Chamber- subject to his audit. The assent of the Controller is neceslain, Sinking Fund. sary to all agreements for the acquisition of real estate.

He receives a salary of $15,000 a year. He has charge of the Wallabout Market. The Mayor appoints the Chamberlain of the city, who receives all moneys paid into the treasury of the city. His salary is $12,000 a year, The Sinking Fund Commissioners consist of the Mayor, Controller, Chamberlain, president of the Board of Aldermen and chairman of the Finance Committee of the Board of Aldermen. This board administers the various sinking funds.

The Board of Estimate and Apportionment consists of the Mayor, the Controller, the president of the Board of Aldermen, and the presidents of the bor.

oughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, The Bronx, Queens and RichThe Board of mond. Except as specifically provided by the charter, every act Estimate and of the board must be adopted, if adopted, by a majority of the Apportionment. whole number of votes authorized by this section to be cast

by said board. The Mayor, Controller and the president of the Board of Aldermen shall each be entitled to cast three votes, the presidents of the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn shall each be eatitled to cast two votes, and the presidents of the boroughs of The Bronx, Queens and Richmond shall each be entitled to cast one vote. A quorum of said board shall consist of a sufficient number of the members thereof to cast nine votes, of whom at least two of the members hereby authorized to cast three votes each shall be present." It is provided that this board shall annually “make a budget of the amounts estimated to be required to pay the expenses of conducting the public business of the city of New-York, and of the counties of New-York, Kings, Queens and Richmond for the next ensuing year. Such budget shall be prepared in such detail as to the titles of appropriations, the terms and conditions, not inconsistent with law under which the same may be expended, the aggregate sum and the items thereof allowed to each department, bureau, office, board or commission, as the said Board of Estimate and Apportionment shall deem advisable." The budget is submitted to the Board of Aldermen, The act then says: "The Board of Algermen may reduce the said several amounts fixed by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, except such amounts as are now or may hereafter be fixed by law, and except such amounts as may be inserted by the said Board of Estimate and Apportionment for the payment of State taxes and payment of interest and principal of the city debt, but the Board of Aldermen may not increase such amounts nor vary the terms and conditions thereof, nor insert any new items. Such action of the Board of Aldermen on reducing any item or amount fixed by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment shall be subject to the veto power of the Mayor, as elsewhere provided in this act, and unless such veto is overridden by a three-fourths vote of the Board of Aldermen, the item or amount as fixed by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment shall stand as part of the budget.” The Board of Estimate and Apportionment also is directed to include in its final estimate money for the support of a large number of charitable institutions, which are named.

« PreviousContinue »