Community Without Unity: A Politics of Derridian Extravagance

Front Cover
Duke University Press, 1989 - Philosophy - 261 pages
Winner of the 1990 Foundations of Political Theory Section of the American Political Science Association "First Book Award"

Now available in paperback with a new preface by the author, this award-winning book breaks new ground by challenging traditional concepts of community in political theory. William Corlett brings the diverse (and sometimes contradictory) work of Foucault and Derrida to bear on the thought of Pocock, Burke, Lincoln, and McIntyre, among others, to move beyond the conventional dichotomy of "individual vs. community," arguing instead that community is best advanced within a politics of difference.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Mutual Service and the Language of Domination
6
Reciprocity Commonality Mutual Service
16
Opening Up the Dialogue Between Remunity and Communion
35
Reassurance
65
Pocock Foucault Forces of Reassurance
69
The Problem of Time in Lincolnian Political Religion
91
The Power of Fear in Burkean Traditionalism
118
Extravagance
143
Practicing Derridian Confession Supplementing Foucault
163
Redrawing the Lignes de Bataille
184
Supplement
205
Taking Time Out for Community
209
Notes
219
References
243
Index
255
Copyright

Announcing Derridian Confession Spacing Deferral Writing
146

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1989)

Fredric R. Jameson, Marxist theorist and professor of comparative literature at Duke University, was born in Cleveland in 1934. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University and taught at Harvard, the University of California at San Diego, and Yale University before moving to Duke in 1985. He most famous work is Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, which won the Modern Language Association's Lowell Award. Jameson was among the first to associate a specific set of political and economic circumstances with the term postmodernism. His other books include Sartre: The Origin of a Style, The Seeds of Time, and The Cultural Turn.

Bibliographic information