Journal of the Franklin Institute, Volume 134

Front Cover
Pergamon Press, 1892 - Electronic journals
Vols. 1-69 include more or less complete patent reports of the U. S. Patent Office for years 1825-1859. cf. Index to v. 1-120 of the Journal, p. [415]
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 109 - One of the means to this end was the erection of a breakwater for protection of the entrance. This massive work which will ultimately absorb many hundred thousand cubic yards of the rock excavated from the Divide cut, has been pushed out about 1,000 feet, and is continually being filled in with brush mattresses, rock and hydraulic cement concrete. Quarters for accommodation of the workmen and storage for supplies were erected near this work. A railroad track was laid upon the breakwater as it advanced,...
Page 126 - An interoceanic canal across the American Isthmus will essentially change the geographical relations between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States, and between the United States and the rest of the world.
Page 117 - River and Lake, together with the extensive plant of the navigation company, consisting of offices, lands, steamboats, tugs, lighters, repair shops, etc. (13) And lastly, what is felt to be the most important result of all is the demonstration, secured by experience, of the salubrity of the climate, the efficiency of labor, and the sufficiency of the estimates of the chief engineer for the harbor and canal dredging and railroad work. The Government of Nicaragua, by a communication dated November...
Page 363 - ... year. If the river carried away any portion of a man's lot, he appeared before the king, and related what had happened; upon which the king sent persons to examine, and determine by measurement the exact extent of the loss; and thenceforth only such a rent was demanded of him as was proportionate to the reduced size of his land. From this practice, I think, geometry first came to be known in Egypt, whence it passed into Greece.
Page 413 - President be empowered to appoint a committee of three to confer with a similar committee to be named by the Manufacturers...
Page 126 - Our merely commercial interest in it is greater than that of all other countries, while its relations to our power and prosperity as a nation, to our means of defense, our unity, peace, and safety, are matters of paramount concern to the people of the United States.
Page 117 - ... miles of this line. (10) The acquisition by purchase of the most valuable and powerful dredging plant to be found in America under one management. (11) The fitting up and operation of this plant and the opening of over a mile of the canal. (12) The acquirement by purchase of the valuable and exclusive franchise for the steam navigation of the San Juan River and Lake, together with the extensive plant of the navigation company, consisting of offices, lands, steamboats, tugs, lighters, repair shops,...
Page 124 - In accordance with the early and later policy of the government, in obedience to the often-expressed will of the American people, with a due regard to our national dignity and power, with a watchful care for the safety and prosperity of our interests and industries on this continent, and with a determination to guard against even the first approach of rival powers, whether friendly or hostile, on these shores, I commend an American • canal, on American soil, to the American people...
Page 115 - ... engineers employed on the line have been and are of known and tried ability. Those in positions of chief responsibility have had extensive practice in works of engineering construction in the United States and the tropics. The engineers, administrative staff, surveyors, and nearly all the skilled mechanics have been hired in the United States and sent out under contract for at least a year's service, and several have been continuously employed in Nicaragua for upwards of three years. Natives...
Page 127 - A nation like ours can not rest satisfied with such a separation of its mutually dependent members. We possess an ocean border of considerably over 10,000 miles on the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, and, including Alaska, of some 10,000 miles on the Pacific. Within a generation the western coast has developed into an empire, with a large and rapidly growing population, with vast, but partially developed, resources. At the present rate of increase the end of the century will see us a commonwealth of...

Bibliographic information