Information Respecting United States Bonds, Paper Currency, Coin, Production of Precious Metals, Etc. July 1, 1896, Volume 98

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1896 - Money - 58 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 53 - An act to provide a national currency secured by a pledge of United States bonds, and to provide for the circulation and redemption thereof...
Page 35 - ... [Section 3513 enumerates the dime or ten cent piece among the silver coins of the United States.] " SEC. 3585. The gold coins of the United States shall be a legal tender in all payments at their nominal value when not below the standard weight and limit of tolerance provided by law for the single piece, and, when reduced in weight below such standard and tolerance, shall be a legal tender at valuation in proportion to their actual weight.
Page 9 - Treasury notes shall be a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract, and shall be receivable for customs, taxes, and all public dues, and when so received may be reissued.
Page 36 - January 18, 1837, on which shall be the devices and superscriptions provided by said act ; which coins, together with all silver dollars heretofore coined by the United States, of like weight and fineness, shall be a legal tender, at their nominal value, for all debts and dues, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.
Page 5 - ... shall be received at par in all parts of the United States in payment of taxes, excises, public lands, and all other dues to the United States, except for duties on imports ; and also for all salaries and other debts and demands owing by the United States to individuals, corporations, and associations within the United States, except interest on the public debt, and in redemption of the national currency.
Page 4 - Cold coins, standard silver dollars. subsidiary silver, gold certificates, silver certificates, Treasury notes issued under the Act of July 14, 1890; United States notes (also called greenbacks and legal tenders), National bank notes, and nickel and bronze coins. These forms of money are all available as circulation.
Page 5 - July 14, 1890, are legal tender for all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract. United States notes are legal tender for all debts, public and private, except duties on imports and interest on the public debt.
Page 39 - March 3, 1851; weight, 12% grains; fineness, .750; weight changed, act of March 3, 1853, to 11.52 grains; lineness changed, act of March 3, 1853.
Page 36 - And the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to purchase, from time to time, silver bullion, at the market price thereof, not less than two million dollars...
Page 39 - Weight, 96 grains ; composed of 95 per cent copper and 5 per cent tin and zinc. Coinage discontinued, act of February 12, 1873.

Bibliographic information