The Office of the Chief of Engineers of the Army: Its Non-military History, Activities, and Organization

Front Cover
Johns Hopkins Press, 1923 - Administrative agencies - 166 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page v - THE INSTITUTE FOR GOVERNMENT RESEARCH '• STUDIES IN ADMINISTRATION. The System of Financial Administration of Great Britain. By WF Willoughby, WW Willoughby, and SM Lindsay. 378 pp.
Page 122 - Columbia is hereby placed under the exclusive charge and control of the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army, under such regulations as may be prescribed by the President of the United States, through the Secretary of War.
Page 129 - States providing for taxes on business and trade, or to the act entitled " an act to provide for the construction and maintenance of roads, the establishment and maintenance of schools, and the care and support of insane persons in the District of Alaska, and for other purposes...
Page 128 - Nothing herein shall be construed as affecting the superintendence and control of the Secretary of War over the Washington Aqueduct, its rights, appurtenances, and fixtures connected with the same and over appropriations and expenditures therefor as now provided by law.
Page 20 - That no survey shall be made of any harbors or rivers until the Chief of Engineers shall have directed a preliminary examination of the same by the local engineer in charge of the district, or an engineer detailed for the purpose; and such local or detailed engineer shall report to said Chief of Engineers, whether, in his opinion, said harbor or river is worthy of improvement, and shall state in such report fully and particularly...
Page 2 - That the said corps, when so organized, shall be stationed at West Point in the state of New York, and shall constitute a military academy ; and the engineers, assistant engineers, and cadets of the said corps, shall be subject, at all times, to do duty in such places, and on such service, as the President of the United States shall direct.
Page 112 - ... by the service to which they relate. Secondly, they lay the basis for a system of accounting and reporting that will permit the showing of total expenditures classified according to activities. Finally, taken collectively, they make possible the preparation of a general or consolidated statement of the activities of the government as a whole. Such a statement will reveal in detail, not only what the government is doing, but the services in which the work is being performed. For example, one class...
Page 27 - It is hereby declared to be the policy of the Congress that water terminals are essential at all cities and towns located upon harbors or navigable waterways and that at least one public terminal should exist, constructed, owned, and regulated by the municipality, or other public agency of the State and open to the use of all on equal terms...
Page viii - ... consideration of the relations of all of its parts. No comprehensive effort has been made to list its multifarious activities or to group them in such a way as to present a clear picture of what the Government is doing. Never has a complete description been given of the agencies through which these activities are performed. At no time has the attempt been made to study all of these activities and agencies with a view to the assignment of each activity to the agency best fitted for its performance,...
Page 97 - These outlines are of value not merely as an effective means of making known the organization of the several services. If kept revised to date by the services, they constitute exceedingly important tools of administration. They permit the directing personnel to see at a glance the organization and personnel at their disposition. They establish definitely the line of administrative authority and enable each employee to know his place in the system. They furnish the essential basis for making plans...

Bibliographic information