Memoir and Correspondence of General James Stuart Fraser of the Madras Army

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 22 - Wodyar, that they are required to place themselves under the protection of the British authorities, by whom they will be kindly received, and their rights and privileges respected; and that such of them as may in any way render assistance to the enemy will be considered as traitors and punished accordingly. This proclamation will be carefully made known in Chittledroog, Raidroog, Mysore, Bellary, Malabar, Canara, in order that the relatives of such persons as have taken service in Coorg from those...
Page 420 - Nizam, fully and promptly, throughout his whole dominions. If rebellion or disturbance shall be excited, or if the just claims and authority of His Highness shall be resisted, the said contingent, after the reality of the offence shall have been duly ascertained, shall be employed to reduce the offenders to submission.
Page 150 - Government, and you will be mindful that even the necessary acts of authority may be clothed with the veil of courtesy and regard. 4. You will distinctly understand that the further extension of its dominions forms no part of the policy of the British Government; that it is desirous on all occasions of respecting the independence of native states...
Page 5 - I have contrived to turn a very slender portion of literary talents to some account, by a publication of the poetical antiquities of the Border, where the old people had preserved many ballads descriptive of the manners of the country during the wars with England. This trifling collection was so well received by a discerning public, that, after receiving...
Page 10 - It is very bleak at present, having little to recommend it but the vicinity of the river ; but as the ground is well adapted by nature to grow wood, and is considerably various in form and appearance, I have no doubt that by judicious plantations it may be rendered a very pleasant spot ; and it is at present my great amusement to plan the various lines which may be necessary for that purpose.
Page 420 - The subsidiary force will, at all times, be ready to execute services of importance, such as the protection of the person of His Highness, his heirs, and successors, the overawing and chastisement of rebels, or exciters of disturbance in His Highness...
Page 21 - The conduct of the Rajah of Coorg has for a long time past been of such a nature as to render him unworthy of the friendship and protection of the British Government. Unmindful of his duty as a ruler, and regardless of his obligations as a dependent ally of the East India Company, he has been guilty of the greatest oppression and cruelty towards the people subject to his government, and he has evinced the most wanton disrespect of the authority of, and the most hostile disposition towards, the former,...
Page 10 - I intend building a small cottage here for my- summer abode, being obliged by law, as well as induced by inclination, to make this country my residence for some months every year. This is the greatest incident which has lately taken place in our domestic concerns, and I assure you we are not a little proud of being greeted as laird and lady of Abbotsford.
Page 85 - During the scarcity which prevailed last year in this country, and in the Company's neighbouring districts, it was the subject of remark by every traveller coming here from Madras or Masulipatam, that the moment they entered the Nizam's dominions all the worst appearances of famine in a great measure ceased. They no longer saw the villages filled with the dead and the dying...
Page 22 - Vodeyar is no longer to be considered as Rajah of Coorg, that the persons and property of all those who conduct themselves peaceably or in aid of the operations of the British troops, shall be respected, and that such a system of Government shall be established, as may seem best calculated to secure the happiness of the people. It is also hereby made known to all British subjects, who may have entered the service of Virarajendra...

Bibliographic information