Senator Benjamin H. Hill of Georgia: His Life, Speeches and Writings

Front Cover
T. H. P. Bloodworth, 1893 - Confederate States of America - 823 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 121 - He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the LORD; and that which he hath given will he pay him again.
Page 653 - The powers of the legislature are defined and limited; and that those limits may not be mistaken, or forgotten, the constitution is written. To what purpose are powers limited, and to what purpose is that limitation committed to writing, if these limits may, at any time, be passed by those intended to be restrained?
Page 653 - Between these alternatives there is no middle ground. The Constitution is either a superior paramount law, unchangeable by ordinary means, or it is on a level with ordinary legislative acts, and, like other acts, is alterable when the Legislature shall please to alter it.
Page 610 - The difference between a federal and national government, as it relates to the operation of the government, is supposed to consist in this, that in the former the powers operate on the political bodies composing the Confederacy, in their political capacities ; in the latter, on the individual citizens composing the nation, in their individual capacities.
Page 117 - God, in his wise providence, to take out of this world the soul of our deceased brother, we therefore commit his body to the ground; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust; looking for the general Resurrection in the last, day, and the life of the world to come, through our Lord Jesus Christ...
Page 751 - ... that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 215 - And the children of Israel wept for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days : so the days of weeping and mourning for Moses were ended.
Page 85 - Behold, thou hast made my days as an handbreadth; and mine age is as nothing before thee: verily every man at his best state is altogether vanity.
Page 137 - With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this, — " Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last ; You spurn'd me such a day ; another time You call'd me dog ; and for these courtesies I'll lend you thus much moneys ?
Page 610 - That it will be a federal and not a national act, as these terms are understood by the objectors; the act of the people as forming so many independent States, not as forming one aggregate nation...

Bibliographic information