Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change

Front Cover
Addison-Wesley Professional, 2000 - Computers - 190 pages
Software development projects can be fun, productive, and even daring. Yet they can consistently deliver value to a business and remain under control.

Extreme Programming (XP) was conceived and developed to address the specific needs of software development conducted by small teams in the face of vague and changing requirements. This new lightweight methodology challenges many conventional tenets, including the long-held assumption that the cost of changing a piece of software necessarily rises dramatically over the course of time. XP recognizes that projects have to work to achieve this reduction in cost and exploit the savings once they have been earned.

Fundamentals of XP include:

  • Distinguishing between the decisions to be made by business interests and those to be made by project stakeholders.
  • Writing unit tests before programming and keeping all of the tests running at all times.
  • Integrating and testing the whole system--several times a day.
  • Producing all software in pairs, two programmers at one screen.
  • Starting projects with a simple design that constantly evolves to add needed flexibility and remove unneeded complexity.
  • Putting a minimal system into production quickly and growing it in whatever directions prove most valuable.

Why is XP so controversial? Some sacred cows don't make the cut in XP:

  • Don't force team members to specialize and become analysts, architects, programmers, testers, and integrators--every XP programmer participates in all of these critical activities every day.
  • Don't conduct complete up-front analysis and design--an XP project starts with a quick analysis of the entire system, and XPprogrammers continue to make analysis and design decisions throughout development.
  • Develop infrastructure and frameworks as you develop your application, not up-front--delivering business value is the heartbeat that drives XP projects.
  • Don't write and maintain implementation documentation--communication in XP projects occurs face-to-face, or through efficient tests and carefully written code.

You may love XP, or you may hate it, but "Extreme Programming Explained" will force you to take a fresh look at how you develop software.
0201616416B04062001

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
15
4 stars
9
3 stars
5
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - paven - LibraryThing

XP is such a good set of patterns, Raising great development practices to a system that enhancing each other. This should be read by anyone taking part in a development team or tightly interacting with it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - scottjpearson - LibraryThing

This book helped change the way that software development is generally practiced, from the leadership to the programmers, from the business to the design. It is important to note that this book has ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
V
3
VII
7
IX
11
XI
15
XIII
21
XIV
27
XVI
29
XXXVI
97
XXXVIII
103
XL
115
XLI
121
XLIII
123
XLV
125
XLVII
131
XLIX
139

XVIII
37
XX
43
XXII
51
XXIV
53
XXVI
63
XXVIII
71
XXX
77
XXXII
81
XXXIV
85
LI
149
LIII
151
LV
155
LVII
159
LVIII
165
LX
167
LXI
177
LXII
181
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Kent Beck consistently challenges software engineering dogma, promoting ideas like patterns, test-driven development, and Extreme Programming. Currently affiliated with Three Rivers Institute and Agitar Software, he is the author of many Addison-Wesley titles.



Bibliographic information